RV power inlet?

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RV power inlet?

Postby 225 » Sat Jul 09, 2016 10:38 am

I see they have power inlet's for 50 amp RV's and they say 125/250A on them. Is this the same plug thats on the 20A inlets? Not the 120v household plug, but the twist lock.

Thanks
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Re: RV power inlet?

Postby troubleScottie » Sat Jul 09, 2016 2:20 pm

You need to do more reading. Google rv electrical and look in this forum in the electrical section.

50 amp service is 2 phase 120/240V service as one would see on a household electric dryer or stove. It provides the most power of all the connections. It requires some electrical connections to change it back to single phase 120 service. You could use a 50 amp distribution panel or there are adapters for making the conversion to single phase and different power output. Although I have not seen anyone use this directly, one could do that too.

30 amp service is single phase 120 service providing up to 3,600 watts of power. The connector is different from your household connectors, but it is the same voltage and phase. This provides more power than a 15 amp service.

The pedestal generally also have a 120 20 amp connector and 15 amp 120 service. Both of these are basically what you see in your house.

The major difference with all these connection is the amount of power that you can draw. If you are camping light eg a few LED lights, charging a USB device and charging your single battery, the 15 amp service might be fine. If you are glamping, 50 amp might be more appropriate.

To a large extent you have decide what you want to do for your AC wiring as with DC wiring : having a distribution panel or not, connections for DC chargers, number of GFCI outlets, air conditioner, how long any device is on, etc. Then build in the electrical components eg inlet adapter, distribution panel/circuit breakers, power strips, wiring to the outlets, GFCI outlets, covers for external outlets, connections for chargers, any directly wired appliances (AC?). Obviously you need to decide where everything goes eg in tongue, wire runs in walls or floor or ceiling or conduit.

Then you have to figure how to connect to external AC power be it a generator or the AC pedestal from your TD.

In addition, you might want to invest in circuit testers and possible electrical surge protector/filters. RV camp sites are not known for their high quality electrical service.
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Re: RV power inlet?

Postby Dale M. » Sun Jul 10, 2016 9:22 am

troubleScottie wrote:You need to do more reading. Google rv electrical and look in this forum in the electrical section.

50 amp service is 2 phase 120/240V service as one would see on a household electric dryer or stove. It provides the most power of all the connections. It requires some electrical connections to change it back to single phase 120 service. You could use a 50 amp distribution panel or there are adapters for making the conversion to single phase and different power output. Although I have not seen anyone use this directly, one could do that too.

30 amp service is single phase 120 service providing up to 3,600 watts of power. The connector is different from your household connectors, but it is the same voltage and phase. This provides more power than a 15 amp service.

The pedestal generally also have a 120 20 amp connector and 15 amp 120 service. Both of these are basically what you see in your house.

The major difference with all these connection is the amount of power that you can draw. If you are camping light eg a few LED lights, charging a USB device and charging your single battery, the 15 amp service might be fine. If you are glamping, 50 amp might be more appropriate.

To a large extent you have decide what you want to do for your AC wiring as with DC wiring : having a distribution panel or not, connections for DC chargers, number of GFCI outlets, air conditioner, how long any device is on, etc. Then build in the electrical components eg inlet adapter, distribution panel/circuit breakers, power strips, wiring to the outlets, GFCI outlets, covers for external outlets, connections for chargers, any directly wired appliances (AC?). Obviously you need to decide where everything goes eg in tongue, wire runs in walls or floor or ceiling or conduit.

Then you have to figure how to connect to external AC power be it a generator or the AC pedestal from your TD.

In addition, you might want to invest in circuit testers and possible electrical surge protector/filters. RV camp sites are not known for their high quality electrical service.


Believe you are wrong... I am unaware of any wiring system in US that is 2 phase, it either single phase or 3 phase... 50 Amp circuits found in home adjournment and trailer parks are generally 240 volt and driveled for using 2 120 volt circuits on each leg of circuit, but its still single phase...

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Re: RV power inlet?

Postby Dale M. » Sun Jul 10, 2016 9:25 am

225 wrote:I see they have power inlet's for 50 amp RV's and they say 125/250A on them. Is this the same plug thats on the 20A inlets? Not the 120v household plug, but the twist lock.

Thanks


Are you sure it is not 125/250V (for volts).... 125 to 250 Amps is arc welding currents...

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Re: RV power inlet?

Postby H.A. » Sun Jul 10, 2016 1:39 pm

Sadly many people confuse split singlephase as 2 phase.
Split singlephase is typical configuration for virtually all northamerica household (including trailerparks) electric service.

2 phase power is technically possible but no where is it used as a gridpower.
Just like 3 phase, it still requires 3 conductors. All three conductors of a 2 phase system carry equal load current. Its silly to abandon 33% greater efficiency by not adding a third phase.

Back on topic..
A 50amp 125-250V turn-n-pull connector may look similar (at a distance...)its considerably different than a 20amp 125V connector.
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