Newb looking into wiring

Anything electric, AC or DC

Newb looking into wiring

Postby stanger1944 » Tue Jul 26, 2016 8:48 pm

Ok so I am currently gathering info for my teardrop build. My question is how do I set up wiring for both 12 volt running off deep cycle battery and 120 volt plug in for plugging into camp sites? :twisted:
stanger1944
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 2:50 am

Re: Newb looking into wiring

Postby m.colley » Tue Jul 26, 2016 9:19 pm

stanger1944 wrote:Ok so I am currently gathering info for my teardrop build. My question is how do I set up wiring for both 12 volt running off deep cycle battery and 120 volt plug in for plugging into camp sites? :twisted:


There's alot of different ways to accomplish what your asking. Alot of builders use a power center like the PD4045. Its a power converter, 3 step charger and both 120V and 12V distribution panel all in one. It all depends on how simple or complex you want to get. Some use a simple battery with a battery charger and a power strip and 12v fuse/distribution panel. There's alot of information in several threads here on the forum, there's even a few sample wiring schematic's.


Martin
m.colley
The 300 Club
 
Posts: 443
Images: 83
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2016 4:26 am
Location: Columbus Georgia

Re: Newb looking into wiring

Postby noseoil » Tue Jul 26, 2016 10:08 pm

PD4045
Build log: viewtopic.php?f=50&t=60248
The time you spend planning is more important than the time you spend building.........

Image
User avatar
noseoil
1000 Club
1000 Club
 
Posts: 1278
Images: 66
Joined: Sun Apr 27, 2014 8:46 am
Top

Re: Newb looking into wiring

Postby aggie79 » Tue Jul 26, 2016 11:17 pm

Or the newer PD 4135.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Tom (& Linda)
For more on our Silver Beatle teardrop:
Build Thread

93503
User avatar
aggie79
Super Duper Lifetime Member
 
Posts: 4838
Images: 666
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2007 5:42 pm
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Top

Re: Newb looking into wiring

Postby troubleScottie » Wed Jul 27, 2016 3:12 am

Generally speaking you are building 2 separate systems -- a 12 VDC system and 120 VAC system. For resell value, most people want both.

The 12VDC can cover (generally what is the minimum DC system, yes you can go even lower )
Lights -- interior/exterior/reading -- mostly LED (less power, brighter )
12 V charging/USB charging for phones, laptops, etc.
Fan

Many add an inverter ( convert 12VDC to 120VAC ) to run small, non-resistive appliances for short intervals. A hair dryer is NOT a small appliance.

You can also add:
radio/sound system
TV
CD/DVD players
water pump
instant water heater
Refrig/Freezer (generally both 12VDC/120VAC)
weather radio/ham/CB radios
toys


AC is generally used for :
charging your battery/supporting your 12VDC system (converter)
Air conditioning
Heaters
kitchen appliances - coffee maker, microwave
any continuously running device

DC power is dependent on
how much battery you have, measured in Amp Hours
how you will recharge -- generator/solar/shore power/towing vehicle/wait to get home
how much power you consume

Basically you have to do the math to finger out what you can do. The question becomes what do you REQUIRE to camp? What do you WANT when you camp? Are you really just boondocking or are you glamping? Do you expect to always camp with AC available? Remember, sometimes camp grounds are full. Being able to park in the tent area/walmat lot might be useful.

Read the electrical section, there is a lot there. Look at the diagrams for wiring your TD. Also look for the lists of power consumption by device. Similar and very important, how do you want to charge/recharge your battery. Lots of ideas and methods for making it happen.

Remember with a lead acid battery, you can use about 50% of the power it is rated for. A 100 AH battery really can only deliver 50 AH. Then you must recharge.

Also inverters ( DC to AC ) are inefficient.
Michael Krolewski
Scottish Terrier Fancier
troubleScottie
Teardrop Master
 
Posts: 130
Images: 10
Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2015 5:02 am
Location: Seattle, WA
Top

Re: Newb looking into wiring

Postby les45 » Wed Jul 27, 2016 4:00 am

On my first build, I used the PD 4045 and it was great. However, on my current project (a different kind of pop-up), I decided to go a little more basic. We only camp where there is park power so I saw no need for a battery. Like someone else said, you have basically an AC system (appliances and entertainment stuff) and a DC system (mainly lighting and charging stuff). You can actually say you have two DC systems if you consider your trailer running lights as a separate DC system. My AC is simply an inlet for connecting a power cord to the camp power pole and a small breaker box used as a master switch that distributes two or three circuits to receptacles used mainly in the galley area. My DC system will be an old computer power supply making 14 amps of 12 volt DC and it will be used for lighting, charging electronic gadgets, and my Fantastic Fan. My first system with the PD and battery cost about $400 to build. My current system will cost less than $100.
User avatar
les45
500 Club
 
Posts: 812
Images: 383
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2012 8:57 am
Location: Aiken, South Carolina
Top

Newb looking into wiring

Postby Pixie Susan » Fri Aug 05, 2016 12:52 pm

les45 wrote:On my first build, I used the PD 4045 and it was great. However, on my current project (a different kind of pop-up), I decided to go a little more basic. We only camp where there is park power so I saw no need for a battery. Like someone else said, you have basically an AC system (appliances and entertainment stuff) and a DC system (mainly lighting and charging stuff). You can actually say you have two DC systems if you consider your trailer running lights as a separate DC system. My AC is simply an inlet for connecting a power cord to the camp power pole and a small breaker box used as a master switch that distributes two or three circuits to receptacles used mainly in the galley area. My DC system will be an old computer power supply making 14 amps of 12 volt DC and it will be used for lighting, charging electronic gadgets, and my Fantastic Fan. My first system with the PD and battery cost about $400 to build. My current system will cost less than $100.


Can you explain your current system principle as related to my TD? I have a 110v male 3 prong on the outside of my camper that I plug an extension cord to for shore power. It powers a single gang outlet and a light fixture inside (that's all). I'd like to get a 12v vent fan (prob Fan-tastic) but am unsure how to wire things up. When I'm not on shore power, I have a 2000w inverter generator I plug into the outside of the TD with the extension cord. I've thought about adding one deep cycle battery to operate the phone chargers, tablet, and portable 12v fans in those times I am boondocking and can't run the generator (rules, rules).

We are prob upgrading campers in a couple years so I don't want to create an elaborate or costly system. Currently I use a little Anker portable battery for the fans while we sleep but it only gets us through a night or two.

Can you give me your thoughts? First and foremost I'd like to get a vent fan in there and THEN tackle 12v battery backup.

Thanks for any advice.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
User avatar
Pixie Susan
Teardrop Advisor
 
Posts: 82
Images: 2
Joined: Sun Dec 27, 2015 2:04 pm
Top

Re: Newb looking into wiring

Postby Camp4Life » Tue Aug 16, 2016 10:56 am

Pixie Susan wrote:
les45 wrote:On my first build, I used the PD 4045 and it was great. However, on my current project (a different kind of pop-up), I decided to go a little more basic. We only camp where there is park power so I saw no need for a battery. Like someone else said, you have basically an AC system (appliances and entertainment stuff) and a DC system (mainly lighting and charging stuff). You can actually say you have two DC systems if you consider your trailer running lights as a separate DC system. My AC is simply an inlet for connecting a power cord to the camp power pole and a small breaker box used as a master switch that distributes two or three circuits to receptacles used mainly in the galley area. My DC system will be an old computer power supply making 14 amps of 12 volt DC and it will be used for lighting, charging electronic gadgets, and my Fantastic Fan. My first system with the PD and battery cost about $400 to build. My current system will cost less than $100.


Can you explain your current system principle as related to my TD? I have a 110v male 3 prong on the outside of my camper that I plug an extension cord to for shore power. It powers a single gang outlet and a light fixture inside (that's all). I'd like to get a 12v vent fan (prob Fan-tastic) but am unsure how to wire things up. When I'm not on shore power, I have a 2000w inverter generator I plug into the outside of the TD with the extension cord. I've thought about adding one deep cycle battery to operate the phone chargers, tablet, and portable 12v fans in those times I am boondocking and can't run the generator (rules, rules).

We are prob upgrading campers in a couple years so I don't want to create an elaborate or costly system. Currently I use a little Anker portable battery for the fans while we sleep but it only gets us through a night or two.

Can you give me your thoughts? First and foremost I'd like to get a vent fan in there and THEN tackle 12v battery backup.

Thanks for any advice.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


What les45 did was basically make a system that runs entirely off of AC but still has the ability to power 12v devices. From the sounds of it, you're mostly on AC power, either shore or generator. So as les45 did, you can get yourself a computer power supply (Commonly called a Power Supply Unit, or PSU). They plug into AC, and have multiple 12v and 5v outputs. So you can just plug it right into your AC gang outlet like you would a computer.

Unless you find an older one that has all the labels on it, I would buy a new one as they're not expensive. The PSU would basically be a reverse-inverter, or an AC-DC converter. You can wire up your lights and vent fan to the PSU pretty easily. Keep in mind that these make a bit of heat and have a fan inside them that's always running. I would recommend some kind of air filter taped over the fan to keep dust out. And you must keep them dry! So plan the placements accordingly :thinking:

Afterwards, once you have this wired up, you can add a battery into the mix later on by adding a switch that will choose either the PSU or the battery for its power source.
Camp4Life
Teardrop Master
 
Posts: 219
Images: 4
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 3:49 pm
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Top


Return to Electrical Secrets

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest