12V Newb

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12V Newb

Postby DeenaB » Mon Sep 26, 2016 7:15 pm

Trying to learn as much as I can, my question, while using a converter or inverter, that's my next question, while using either one of these, does it drain the battery converting or inverting? Which of these do I use. Currently I have a group 27. Hope my questions make sense. Thanks
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Re: 12V Newb

Postby Padilen » Mon Sep 26, 2016 8:53 pm

A converter converts 110 to 12vdc. I don't know what converter your using. But a battery shouldn't *** be needed for one to convert. But if you have 12 vdc wiring and no 110, you do need the battery. Your 12vdc will last as long as the battery's hold enough charge.
The inverter inverts 12vdc to 110. So (I don't have one yet) if I understand how it works you need a source of 12vdc- a 12 v battery to get 110. Battery's discharge is based on what you are running.


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Re: 12V Newb

Postby noseoil » Wed Sep 28, 2016 8:20 am

On any 12 volt system, you need to charge the battery. This can happen from a converter (110v in, a generator or shore power), tow vehicle or solar panel.

An inverter takes 12 volts from the battery & turns it into 110 volts. Typically, an inverter has some parasitic drain associated with it when used (15-20% is usual). Normally they are switched, so they are "on" only when the 110v power is needed & being used for an appliance.
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Re: 12V Newb

Postby jondbar628 » Wed Sep 28, 2016 9:42 am

hey 12VNewb.....What Noseoil said.....Plus, If you're getting an inverter, pay the most attention to the "continuous output" rating rather than the "peak load rating". Peak load usually only comes into play when dealing with a motorized appliance such as a fan or maybe one of those mini-compressors for tire inflation. For things such as lighting, coffeemakers and such, you need to know what they draw versus the continuous usage rating of the inverter.
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Re: 12V Newb

Postby DeenaB » Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:50 pm

jondbar628 wrote:hey 12VNewb.....What Noseoil said.....Plus, If you're getting an inverter, pay the most attention to the "continuous output" rating rather than the "peak load rating". Peak load usually only comes into play when dealing with a motorized appliance such as a fan or maybe one of those mini-compressors for tire inflation. For things such as lighting, coffeemakers and such, you need to know what they draw versus the continuous usage rating of the inverter.

Ok , I think I see here.....so coming from my 12v source, deep cell group 27, go to an inverter to swap over to 110, is this where the pure sine wave comes into play? I don't foresee much more other than coffe maker, occasional laptop use age,cell phone charging, trying to stay as simple as I can just to be able to boondock camp when needed. This is new to me trying to learn, thanks folks
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Re: 12V Newb

Postby m.colley » Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:49 pm

DeenaB wrote:
jondbar628 wrote:hey 12VNewb.....What Noseoil said.....Plus, If you're getting an inverter, pay the most attention to the "continuous output" rating rather than the "peak load rating". Peak load usually only comes into play when dealing with a motorized appliance such as a fan or maybe one of those mini-compressors for tire inflation. For things such as lighting, coffeemakers and such, you need to know what they draw versus the continuous usage rating of the inverter.

Ok , I think I see here.....so coming from my 12v source, deep cell group 27, go to an inverter to swap over to 110, is this where the pure sine wave comes into play? I don't foresee much more other than coffe maker, occasional laptop use age,cell phone charging, trying to stay as simple as I can just to be able to boondock camp when needed. This is new to me trying to learn, thanks folks



In a nutshell YES. If you left off the coffee maker on your list above, you wouldn't even need the inverter. Depending on your battery size ( in AMP hours) a decent size battery would charge/supply power to the laptop, cell phone charger etc for quite some time. You'd need a way to charge the battery for extended use and there are some 12V coffee makers out there or do like I do and use propane and a small two burner stove.


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Re: 12V Newb

Postby yrock87 » Mon Oct 03, 2016 6:06 pm

Be warned that batterys do not have very good energy density. Meaning your 1500watt coffee maker running for 10 minutes to brew will use about 32 amp hours. A group 27 only holds about 100 amp hours, and you don't want to drain your battery below 50%. So your group 27 has 50 usable amp hours, and brewing one pot of coffee and then immediately turning it off will use over half of your availability battery capacity.
It would leave on 18 amp hours for running lights, fans, ext for the rest of your weekend. Which you will easily burn though if you are running your fan or charging a laptop.

I would recommend a Moka pot, French press, or percolator (in that order) and a propane stove for coffee while boondocking. As a bonus, the first two make good coffee and can be used at home or the office.
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Re: 12V Newb

Postby DeenaB » Mon Oct 03, 2016 8:29 pm

Scared me for a moment m volley, leave off the coffee pot, o my. Thanks guys, have already been reading about the French press direction. Have liked what I have read already. After this past weekend in an area without service, I know I could leave off the cell phone ,Internet etc behind, but not the coffee. Thanks folks
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Re: 12V Newb

Postby GuitarPhotog » Mon Oct 03, 2016 9:38 pm

French press works fine in the field. Just get a kettle to heat the water in on your propane stove. As yrock87 says, heating with electricity is very inefficient and will eat your battery capacity very quickly.

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Re: 12V Newb

Postby m.colley » Fri Oct 07, 2016 4:49 pm

DeenaB wrote:Scared me for a moment m volley, leave off the coffee pot, o my. Thanks guys, have already been reading about the French press direction. Have liked what I have read already. After this past weekend in an area without service, I know I could leave off the cell phone ,Internet etc behind, but not the coffee. Thanks folks



Oh no, I'd never suggest you leave off the coffee pot. The wife and I use a 8 cup percolator on a propane stove when boondocking and a Mr. Coffee when on shore power. There's nothing like fresh perked coffee for flavor..


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Re: 12V Newb

Postby yrock87 » Fri Oct 07, 2016 5:34 pm

m.colley wrote:
DeenaB wrote:Scared me for a moment m volley, leave off the coffee pot, o my. Thanks guys, have already been reading about the French press direction. Have liked what I have read already. After this past weekend in an area without service, I know I could leave off the cell phone ,Internet etc behind, but not the coffee. Thanks folks



Oh no, I'd never suggest you leave off the coffee pot. The wife and I use a 8 cup percolator on a propane stove when boondocking and a Mr. Coffee when on shore power. There's nothing like fresh perked coffee for flavor..


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Yug! Call me a coffee snob, but I hate percolater coffee.
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Re: 12V Newb

Postby daveesl77 » Fri Oct 07, 2016 5:52 pm

I've used pretty much every type of coffee maker imaginable and my personal favorite is the Bialetti Moka Express. Get the "6" cup model at a minimum.

https://www.amazon.com/Bialetti-6-Cup-Stovetop-Espresso-Maker/dp/B000CNY6UK/ref=sr_1_1?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1475880869&sr=1-1&keywords=moka+express


This little gem is all we use at home and camping. It is aluminum and small. Only other thing you need is a tea kettle for hot water.

Put water in the base of the Moka, up to the bottom of the pressure release valve, add 4 scoops of coffee to the strainer/injector part, screw down the top portion and let her rip. Takes maybe 5 minutes to fully brew. This is like super concentrated coffee elixir. Have a kettle of hot water. Here is the magic part of the Moka. If you want a great cup of "American" style coffee, just pour in about 1/2" of the brewed coffee elixir into the bottom of your mug, add in hot water and bingo, PERFECT! Want espresso, just pour it direct from the Moka, it'll kick butt. Like cappuccino, no problem, just pour in more of the elixir into the cup, add water. Have some whole milk or cream and one of those $7 battery powered foamers, foam up the milk and away you go. We were doing this all over the southwest and folks were amazed that we were in the middle of nowhere with perfect cups of cappuccino every morning. Oh, and you can keep the elixir part and over the day just add hot water to make another cup of perfect coffee, doesn't stale if kept properly for most of a day.

Every Italian home has this thing and it can't be beat. Cheap, almost nothing to break, small, light, easy to clean and fun.

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Re: 12V Newb

Postby jondbar628 » Mon Apr 24, 2017 8:27 pm

As much as I appreciate a REALLY good cuppa coffee, (and I surely do) you're CAMPING dude. Put the percolator on the propane stove (or campfire), throw in a couple of eggshells, and brew it! Think Jedadiah(spell?) Smith (look him up), or Kit Carson. You ain't sittin' on the Champes de Elyssies. Slowcowboy, where are you when we need you?..........jd
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Re: 12V Newb

Postby daveesl77 » Tue Apr 25, 2017 4:38 pm

Gee, I don't know, but when I spent 6 months living on the Amazon, I really enjoyed a good cup of coffee. When crossing the Atlantic, solo, both times, I liked my coffee. Sitting at Muley Point, yep good coffee. I make it the way that suits me. Oh, and I make my own coffee when in Paris, as I hate French coffee, but I love Italian. For ME, the Moka Express is the best overall coffee maker I have ever found. Some folks don't think you should use propane and prefer buffalo chips, when camping.

:shock:

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