Need advice on cold weather camping clothes.

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Need advice on cold weather camping clothes.

Postby Darren » Wed Oct 14, 2009 2:33 pm

I try to stay close to the fire but sometimes that's not enough to keep warm. I need to pick up some insulated undies or something so I thought I'd check in with you all to see what you're using. Maybe coveralls are better, you tell me what works for you.

Thanks,
Darren
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Postby Ageless » Wed Oct 14, 2009 2:46 pm

I don't like cold, but sometimes it's unavoidable. New fabrics are lighter weight and do a better job; check out Polypropylene.

The real trick is layering so that as you warm up you can remove thin layers to keep from sweating; nothing will chill you like sweat then a good chilly breeze. never wear the day's clothes to bed!! the least amount of moisture will chill you at night.

Keep the head covered!! Most of heat loss is from the skull. i like a good woven wool watchcap; as you can roll it over the ears.

You want to stay 'warm' not 'hot'
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Postby Juneaudave » Wed Oct 14, 2009 3:27 pm

I go with layers and start with a good base layer of polypro (or similar), soft cotten or similar (flannel shirt/soft jeans), and a good hooded goretex shell (pants and jacket). If it is really cold, I'll wear fleece under the shell....and I always pay attention to a good hat that can cover the ears and glove/mitts. In my car, I keep a hip pack with some winter stuff (space blanket(s), hand warmers, matches, a hunk of rope etc) that I put on for even short walks. You never know when you might run into a hypothemia case or something on the trails.

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thermals

Postby laoutdoorsman » Wed Oct 14, 2009 3:45 pm

i strongly recommend under armor coldgear....with the mock t top...expensive, but well worth it...
mike breaux...its pronounced "bro".....
i think i should have taken notes along the way, because ive forgotten waaaay more than i remember...
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Postby kirkman » Wed Oct 14, 2009 5:57 pm

Poly-pro then polar fleece, and last a good parka and snow pant. A lot of guys I hunt with also swear by good wool coat and pants for the final layer.
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Postby Shadow Catcher » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:16 pm

Stay away from cotton! Canoeists know that cotton kills, it retains moisture gains weight and drys slowly. I was on a winter canoe trip, about 20 degrees with ice forming on the paddle as you pulled it out. One canoe dumped, out came the fire starter dry clothing in dry bags and all PolyPro. Polar fleece can be swung arround your head to get it to release most of its moisture and put back one.
One BIG caution! PolyPro and most synthetics burn or melt.
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Postby Karl » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:20 pm

While I hated getting in and out of it, I wore a snowmobile suit at the Indiana Winter Shiveree last year. I liked that because I never had to worry about cold air getting under a coat and freezing my bad back. I'm second from the left. It wasn't stylish but I didn't care since I was comfortably warm in it plus impressing women that weekend wasn't on the agenda. :lol:


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Of course, that attire was not appropriate for the entire weekend as you can see below.

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Postby dakotamouse » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:26 pm

Sportsman's guide catalog has flannel lined jeans. I like em. They're snuggly! :)
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Postby caseydog » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:35 pm

Ageless wrote:The real trick is layering so that as you warm up you can remove thin layers to keep from sweating; nothing will chill you like sweat then a good chilly breeze. never wear the day's clothes to bed!! the least amount of moisture will chill you at night.


Absolutely. You need to layer, and take off, put on as needed.

Under Armour makes good "wicking" layers that move sweat away from your body, to be absorbed by outer layers, or evaporated by air if you work your layers right.

And I agree 100 percent with taking clothes off to go to bed. And, don't forget to remove the socks. I crawled into my sleeping bag tent camping in the snow once, and forgot to take off my socks. I woke up a few hours later and my feet were numb. :duh:
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Re: thermals

Postby caseydog » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:40 pm

laoutdoorsman wrote:i strongly recommend under armor coldgear....with the mock t top...expensive, but well worth it...


+1

I am impressed with Under Armour as a first layer. It keeps you dry and comfortable.

I wish it had been around way back in my snow skiing days, because that activity has you sweating on the ski runs, and freezing on the ski lifts.

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Postby Darren » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:58 pm

Thanks for all the info guys. I do fairly well keeping the top half of my body warm with layering. Mostly have trouble with the legs and feet. I need to remember to change into dry clothes before bed also.
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socks

Postby laoutdoorsman » Wed Oct 14, 2009 7:09 pm

do the same exact thing with the socks....first, some thin poly socks, and then some insulated boot socks...
mike breaux...its pronounced "bro".....
i think i should have taken notes along the way, because ive forgotten waaaay more than i remember...
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Re: socks

Postby caseydog » Wed Oct 14, 2009 7:43 pm

laoutdoorsman wrote:do the same exact thing with the socks....first, some thin poly socks, and then some insulated boot socks...


Yeah, if your feet get cold, get some sock liners to wick moisture away, and some wool socks to go over them.
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Postby hiker chick » Wed Oct 14, 2009 10:29 pm

For long underwear and socks, my favorites are "Smartwool" -- I keep Smartwool ski socks in my teardrop year-around.

My feet have never been cold with Smarwool socks and Lowe hiking boots.

Another must: Fleece Neck Gaiter. A fleece neck gaiter makes a huge difference for me. It was so cold camping this weekend that I wore one to sleep. I'm partial to Turtle Fur brand that REI, and others, carry.

http://www.rei.com/product/663041

You might also try foot warmers that you put in your shoes:

http://www.rei.com/product/730869

http://www.rei.com/product/405012


Since toasty toes are priceless on a cold night, you might also consider the Hotronic m4 Foot Warmer:

http://www.rei.com/product/745511


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Postby Mauleskinner » Thu Oct 15, 2009 10:21 am

Victor Star wrote:Thanks for all the info guys. I do fairly well keeping the top half of my body warm with layering. Mostly have trouble with the legs and feet.

Oddly enough, what's possibly happening is that you're not keeping the top half of your body warm enough. When you're not warm enough, the first thing your body does is cutsdown blood flow to the extremities to "save" itself, and you get cold legs and feet (and hands).

If you're not sweating (and obviously you don't WANT to be), I'd add another good insulation layer to the top half, and see what happens.

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