Need advice on cold weather camping clothes.

Anything to do with camping, fundamentals, secrets, etc...

Postby BC Dave » Sun Dec 20, 2009 2:38 am

Victor Star wrote:Thanks for all the info guys. I do fairly well keeping the top half of my body warm with layering. Mostly have trouble with the legs and feet. I need to remember to change into dry clothes before bed also.


For feet you need a good pair of insulated boots (Leather hiking boots or similar) with a pair of wool hiking socks; Ive spent all day in cold slushy rainy weather in a pair of Rachley gortex lined, insualted hiking boots. I find if the feet are dry and warm thats 1/2 the battle to keep warm; the rest is just breatheable fleece (ploypropiline)(marks work warehouse has great black fleese top & longjons that will do the 90% insulation; another front zip fleece that you can open a close; then a breathable (gortex) outer shell with zips to let out the moisture if you start to sweat ... 20 yrs of working & 40 playing outdoors & in the bush in the 4 seasons. Wool clothing is great too; the original natural fleese, usuall more expensive. I'v hard bluejeans called "blue death"; the most in appropriate thing for wet cold conditions.

Even with leather boots getting wet on the outside from previous days; so long as the insides are dry and you have fresh dry wool socks; you should be good. 1/2 size bigger is a given to fit a good quality pair of wool socks.
User avatar
BC Dave
Teardrop Master
 
Posts: 245
Images: 13
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 12:32 am
Location: BC, Canada

Postby bobhenry » Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:16 am

Speaking of wet feet. The poor mans way is a good pair of hunting socks and a couple small plastic trash bags and then your old leaky boots. The water barrier of a cheap trash bag keeps the body heat in and the water out.Have used this trick for our last 2 January Shivarees and feet stay dry and warm for the total cost of about 16 cents.
Growing older but not up !
User avatar
bobhenry
9000 Club
9000 Club
 
Posts: 9864
Images: 2273
Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 7:49 am
Location: INDIANA, LINDEN

Postby stumphugger » Thu Dec 24, 2009 12:36 pm

Laredo wrote:Old Air Force Security Police Trick:

Pantyhose.

Compared to polypro (which, btw, they inspired) they're cheap.

There's a slightly heavier version called "tights" available in most big box stores, under several brand names. They pack a lot smaller than even the old standby longjohns, altho the newer poly-blend longjohns are quite nice.

Caution:
If you're wearing both, put the thermals *over* the hose, not the other way around. I nearly killed myself walking out of a back branch of Palo Duro Canyon by doing it the other way 'round at Scout Camp over Presidents' Day Weekend a few years ago...


That works, but nowadays there's some very light weight longjohns that you can layer under the heavier ones, then a pair of wool or fleece or other pants over that. I have worn this when working in -20 something temps. The neck gaitor is excellent advice. And try not to sweat.

Why layers? Because of sweating. Some of us, are cool weather people and heat up well. I've run around the woods without gloves in -20 because I have good circulation. Move and stay warm. You can shed layers as you warm. This prevents sweating for some people. When you slow down, the layers are there to put back on as you need them. Another trick is to have a fleece headband. If you are warming up, shed the hat and use the headband to keep your ears warm. Ears are my weakspot.

For feet, anything that works. I like thinsulite. Carry extra pairs of socks and change. Feet get wet from sweat.

Polypro, fleece, and Thinsulite are my friends. Wool is too itchy and I get little hives from it. Just don't get too close to the campfire with your poly stuff on! :shock:
stumphugger
500 Club
 
Posts: 657
Images: 76
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 2:04 pm
Location: Warshington The State
Top

Postby TwilightLane » Sun Dec 27, 2009 12:50 am

A lot of good advice here. I strongly second:
1. wearing a warm hat. heat rises - think of your noggin as a chimney.
2. layering, with wicking layers against your skin: under armour, smart wool, patagonia (has four thicknesses). thermal layers next. then a shell layer on the top.
3. for real cold try down or fill jacket. I saw North Face down jackets at Costco today, dont remember price.

notes:
wear layers, if you start to sweat remove layers or risk getting chilled. if you are working hard, shed layers or open zippers, but put them back on and zip up when you stop.
i've tried to like smart wool but never been a big fan. i like patagonia skivvies but they are pricey. rei has good polypro long undies too.
down is expensive but super comfy and warm, and you got to keep it dry or it fails completely.
keep snow and moisture off of you. knock the snow off your boots. don;t stand or sit on a surface that will draw heat from your body.
Rob & Lori
Aspen & Tundra
My Instructable: http://www.instructables.com/id/Teardro ... l-Trailer/
User avatar
TwilightLane
The 300 Club
 
Posts: 484
Joined: Thu May 14, 2009 4:59 pm
Top

Postby southpennrailroad » Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:01 pm

I don't like the thermal underwear. It does me no good. However I know enough that a layer of loose night fleece pajamas beneath my jeans and in very cold weather I totally feel comfortable as the layers have loose pockets of air to keep me warm. Thermal underwear fits close to my body making the air between the underwear and the jeans feel cold. The fleece gives an extra pocket of warm air between my skin and the fleece. Look at a triple pane window for an example of what I am explaining. I work with windows to know the feeling and example. Do you recall the old jeans with red cowboys design on fleece sown in the jeans when you were young?
Long time researching the abandoned South Pennsylvania Railroad along the Pennsylvania Turnpike. God will guide me. As he has done so in the past. southpennrailroad.com
User avatar
southpennrailroad
500 Club
 
Posts: 858
Images: 0
Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2005 8:05 pm
Location: Monroeville, Pennsylvania
Top

Postby mikeschn » Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:07 pm

southpennrailroad wrote: Do you recall the old jeans with red cowboys design on fleece sown in the jeans when you were young?


You mean flannel lined jeans, right? I love em... wear em every day in this cold weather...

Image

Mike...
The quality is remembered long after the price is forgotten, so build your teardrop with the best materials...
User avatar
mikeschn
Site Admin
 
Posts: 19128
Images: 468
Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2004 11:01 am
Location: MI
Top

Postby southpennrailroad » Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:38 pm

Yeah! That's what I am talking about but I still would wear fleece under them for that extra air pocket. Exploring the old railroad bed in the woods call for warmth from wind and cold.

Thanks
Long time researching the abandoned South Pennsylvania Railroad along the Pennsylvania Turnpike. God will guide me. As he has done so in the past. southpennrailroad.com
User avatar
southpennrailroad
500 Club
 
Posts: 858
Images: 0
Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2005 8:05 pm
Location: Monroeville, Pennsylvania
Top

Previous

Return to Camping Secrets

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Olddog1 and 1 guest