cornbread without milk

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cornbread without milk

Postby Wig » Wed Oct 21, 2009 3:31 pm

I always run out of milk when I need it most.Today I made cornbread with water instead.its a little different but hard to tell.once mixed in a bowl of chili I could tell no difference. I just thought the info would come in handy if you were out camping and ran out or didn't bring any milk.I forgot to mention it was jiffy.
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Postby boomboomtulum » Wed Oct 21, 2009 4:45 pm

So what your sayin' is water will work in a Jiffy?
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Postby Wig » Wed Oct 21, 2009 7:19 pm

yep.you should try it out and tell me what you think.
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Postby UP&ATOM » Thu Dec 10, 2009 5:07 pm

Cottage cheese always works in a pinch as well!

Being from North Cackalacky, we only use Jiffy - and we swap out 1/2 the buttermilk for cottage cheese. Makes'em nice and fluffy.

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Postby Oasis Maker » Thu Dec 10, 2009 5:47 pm

UP&ATOM wrote:Cottage cheese always works in a pinch as well!

Being from North Cackalacky, we only use Jiffy - and we swap out 1/2 the buttermilk for cottage cheese. Makes'em nice and fluffy.

Cheers,


Woo doggy! Now that's conebread.

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Postby S. Heisley » Thu Dec 10, 2009 9:58 pm

I keep nonfat dry milk on hand and just reconstitute it. You can't tell the difference when it is added to things like cornbread/conebread? I also sometimes keep a little canned milk on hand but with that, you can tell the difference in most things.
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Postby Laredo » Thu Dec 10, 2009 10:07 pm

I keep & use powdered buttermilk, which I reconstitute for use in biscuits & cornbread.
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Postby ajricher » Fri Dec 11, 2009 7:14 am

+1 on the dry buttermilk. Works great and has a reasonable shelf life unrefrigerated.

There is nothing quite like scrambled eggs, buttermilk pancakes and bacon on a bright Summer morn when camping...with lots of coffee.

I must confess I can't deal with the taste of canned milk - even in coffee it just doesn't taste right. If I need long-duration milk I will invariably go for Parmalat or some other UHT product. The individual containers work well - open little at a time - and the flavor is fine compared to canned products - nearly indistinguishable from fresh.

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Postby S. Heisley » Fri Dec 11, 2009 8:54 am

ajricher wrote:
If I need long-duration milk I will invariably go for Parmalat or some other UHT product.


Forgive my ignorance; but, I've never heard of Parmalat and don't know what UHT stands for....?
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Postby ajricher » Fri Dec 11, 2009 9:17 am

If you go into the dry-milk area in the grocery store you will see milk on the shelf in white cardboard boxes like big juice boxes. The biggest manufacturer of this product as seen in the US is a company called Parmalat - from Parma Italy (they manufacture all over the world).

UHT is Ultra High Temperature - it is a form of pasteurization.

From Wikipedia:

Ultra-high temperature processing or (less often) ultra-heat treatment (both abbreviated UHT) is the partial sterilization of food by heating it for a short time, around 1–2 seconds, at a temperature exceeding 135°C (275°F), which is the temperature required to kill spores in milk. The most common UHT product is milk, but the process is also used for fruit juices, cream, yogurt, wine, soups, and stews. UHT milk was invented in the 1960s, and became generally available for consumption in 1970s.

The nice thing about this stuff is that it is quite simply just milk - not condensed, evaporated or really messed with. Yes, there is a bit of a flavor difference but I really don't even notice it at all.

I even use it at home, as with just adults in the house we don't tend to go through milk at a great rate. Once opened and refrigerated this product keeps much longer than conventionally pasteurized milk - and a spare is easy to keep on the shelf without worrying about it going bad as well.

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Postby S. Heisley » Fri Dec 11, 2009 9:28 am

ajricher wrote:
...you will see milk on the shelf in white cardboard boxes like big juice boxes.


Oh! Okay, I've used that but, these days, all I can find on the shelves is the chocolate flavored ones. I don't think the plain milk is popular enough to stock on the shelves.

Thanks for the enlightenment on the new UHT way of pasteurizing. ...135 degrees in 1 to 2 seconds?! :shock: Holy Cow! :lol:
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Postby ajricher » Fri Dec 11, 2009 9:39 am

Oh! Okay, I've used that but, these days, all I can find on the shelves is the chocolate flavored ones. I don't think the plain milk is popular enough to stock on the shelves.


I'm surprised - it's actually reasonably popular here in New England. it might be the "stock for storms" factor, though...

You might want to talk to the manager of your grocery store - knowing them they've stocked it with the stewed prunes, yak food or something equally obscure... :) I have noticed that they keep the flavoured UHT milk in a different area (with the juices and so on) than the unflavoured milk.

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Postby S. Heisley » Fri Dec 11, 2009 9:24 pm

ajricher wrote:
You might want to talk to the manager of your grocery store - knowing them they've stocked it with the stewed prunes, yak food or something equally obscure... I have noticed that they keep the flavoured UHT milk in a different area (with the juices and so on) than the unflavoured milk.


Yes, they keep it in with the juice boxes here, too. I would think that they would keep the boxes of shelf-style unflavored milk with the shelf-style chocolate milk. It may be where I live: 1) In the warm, reasonably trouble-free California Sacramento Valley 2) At the far North end of the valley where they sometimes don't ship until they have a full truck load for the store. (You learn to stock up on certain items.)
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