Recommendations for winter unmentionables?

Anything to do with camping, fundamentals, secrets, etc...

Postby jstrubberg » Wed Nov 09, 2011 10:11 am

The Cudl-Duds work pretty well, very well for the price. We just picked up a few from Sam's Club this weekend for my wife for 12 bucks for each piece.

I prefer the RedHead brand, myself. Theirs is about twice the thickness of the Cudl-Duds and much, much warmer. It's also available in tall sizes for those of us with leg and arm extensions. It's a little more expensive at around 22 bucks for each piece, but you only buy one set, so the costs isn't much to worry about.

I prefer polypropelene for an insulating layer over cotton. Poly is warmer, stays warm if it gets damp, doesn't hold odor as badly and dries out a lot faster than cotton. The one downside you need to be aware of is that polypropelene (and spandex, found in more and more of these garments) is PLASTIC. Firefighters call this stuff "shrink wrap". Be CAREFUL around the campfire wearing this stuff!

Having said that, I've hunted and camped in poly layers for 20 years. I've never been injured and don't know of anyone who has. You won't spontaneously combust from wearing this stuff near the fire. Just be aware that if your fire suddenly flares or spits a cloud of sparks your way, your first job is to GET AWAY!

There are other options (merino woll is about the best), but the expense gets a little ridiculous. Merino wool undergarments will keep you warm in just about anything and aren't any kind of fire hazard. Unfortuntely, a set will cost you around $160-$200.
The more stuff I take along, the more time I spend taking care of my stuff!
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Postby Alleged User » Wed Nov 09, 2011 10:23 am

Wow...tons of recommendations. Thanks so much, everyone!

Have quite a few brands to pick from. Hopefully should catch some sales soon.

We'll have the warmest buns east of the Mississippi, thanks to all of you.
:campfire:
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Postby bobhenry » Wed Nov 09, 2011 11:26 am

We Hoosiers are a brave bunch and try each year to be the first group out camping in the new year. So about the second week of January we go a' campin' ! I have no fancy namebrand this's and that's just everyday duds.

Things I have learned.... Wool socks on bare feet then 2 left over plastic shopping bags over them then a pair of athletic socks to hold everything in place then into my footwear. My feet are always dry and warm.

Long sleve cotton tee and sweat pants as the foundation ( later becomes my sleeping atire) . I simply slide on heavy jeans and up top over my tee I put on a pull over sweatshirt then a hooded lined sweatshirt. If wind is biteing I will even pull out my rain gear. It really breaks the wind and helps to retain the body heat. And for those that remember our last shivaree I even lock my big polar coat in the truck ( with the truck keys in the pocket) :fb in case it get cold!

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Postby Shadow Catcher » Wed Nov 09, 2011 1:09 pm

For those of us that canoe in winter or cold weather the saying is cotton kills, as stated it gets wet and stays that way. Poly Pro and fleece are about the best and not too expensive. insulated coveralls and or snow mobile suit work well.
I worked inspections in refineries where the outer layer must be Noemex (fire retardant) and worked comfortably at -20
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Postby Ratkity » Wed Nov 09, 2011 1:26 pm

Shadow Catcher wrote:For those of us that canoe in winter or cold weather the saying is cotton kills, as stated it gets wet and stays that way. Poly Pro and fleece are about the best and not too expensive. insulated coveralls and or snow mobile suit work well.
I worked inspections in refineries where the outer layer must be Noemex (fire retardant) and worked comfortably at -20


Careful with sleeping in just polar fleece! You'll be as furry as your dog heater by the end of the camping weekend! I dunno how, but every dog hair shed sticks to it and those fancy lint rollers are no match for golden retriever hair.

:lol:

Hugs,
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Postby slowcowboy » Wed Nov 09, 2011 9:17 pm

tearhead, 2 pairs of pany hose are for wind armor. and the old pairs are best. good to cut holes where your privates go.

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Postby bobhenry » Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:29 am

Yep ain't it so. The reaction time between needing a fly after the urge strikes and 1/2 way into the moment remembering you DON'T HAVE A FLY! Can be a prelude to disaster.
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Postby DJT » Thu Nov 10, 2011 1:19 pm

I'd recommend 200 series as a base layer (add 300 midlayer and a windproof shell for a full system!) from Woolpower : http://www.woolpower.se/en/default.asp

I've regularly camped down to -40 for up to 10 days without a problem using this system.

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Postby jstrubberg » Thu Nov 10, 2011 2:00 pm

Ulfrotte is great stuff, it's just ridiculously expensive.
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Postby slowcowboy » Thu Nov 10, 2011 7:32 pm

bob thats what we call the wyoming miricale out here its the mircale of a man being able to go bathroom though 6 inchs of clothing with out freezing his privates in a wyoming ground blizzard!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Postby Jeeves » Tue Nov 15, 2011 12:47 pm

I swear by Patagonia Capilene. It's expensive, but it lasts a LONG time. You can get every thickness from silky up to fleecy expedition grade stuff.
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Postby stumphugger » Tue Nov 15, 2011 4:03 pm

Jeeves wrote:I swear by Patagonia Capilene. It's expensive, but it lasts a LONG time. You can get every thickness from silky up to fleecy expedition grade stuff.


I've got a turtleneck that I purchased at least ten years ago. I wore it at least once a week in the winter. I used to work out in the woods year round.
I still wear it. It has small holes torn into the seams on the sleeves. It takes forever to wear out!

For da below zero days in Wisconsin? I wore heavy duty polypro fleece under wool pants. Above waist? Layers. I heat up when I walk. A base layer of the Capilene or something similar, a lightweight fleece pullover, and a coat. Mittens/gloves, thermal socks--no cotton, and a fleece headband under my hardhat. Also, one of those things that you wear around your neck but can be pulled up to cover your nose, or worn as a hat...made out of polar fleece. I did fine with light weight insulated boots, as long as I kept moving.

For here in a milder temperature, but a wetter climate, I also layer. NO COTTON except for the waxed/or oiled tin cloth. I wear a pair of longjohns in polypro or a heavier weight of fleece, then my Filson Tin Pants over those. Socks are thermal either acryllic or a wool mix that wicks. Wick Dry is good.
For above the waist a capilene type shirt, then a light weight micro fleece top.
Depending on the temperature, how far from a vehicle, and my activity level, I might wear a rain coat. Usually, I just went without a rain coat as it was too hot. I kept dry spare clothes in my pickup. I wore the fingerless gloves. Uninsulated rubber boots were enough as I kept moving in them.

For boots, a boot dryer is a good thing to have if you are going out daily. Rubber boots get wet inside from feet sweat and they go on the boot dryer at night.

Think layers and you can't go too wrong.
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Postby JuneBug » Wed Nov 23, 2011 12:20 pm

Carhart insulated zip font coveralls are amazingly wam.
Last few winters in SW coloado used long johnbottoms (ditto on the no cotton) under jeans. It it is easy to remember to layer on top, but wam legs are very important. Ditto on keeping head warm as well as your neck. Snow pacs (rubber boots with thick felt liners) will keep the feet happier than anything else.

Also, using incredibly strong ginger tea helped. Get a big piece of ginger, grate it, put almost boiling water on it and steep for 5 minutes. Strain it and drink it neat. Strong. Good.

Can you heat up your bed before you get in it? A nice warm preheated bed is great -- just make sure you are not the pre-heater for somebody else!
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Postby slowcowboy » Wed Nov 23, 2011 8:23 pm

wyoming winter winds make carhart insulated coveralls look like pajamas!!!!!!!!!!!

a good pair of full length leather chaps and a motor bike coat will beat a pair of carhart coveralls any day up in wyoming.


I think insulated coveralls like carharts are over rated and way on the heavy side to move in.

I hardly use mine any more.

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Postby azmotoman » Mon Nov 28, 2011 7:27 am

Pepper Skins @ Big-5 sporting goods. Worked on 27 degree morning with sleet on a motorcycle!
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