Outdoor arch light

Anything to do with camping, fundamentals, secrets, etc...

Re: Outdoor arch light

Postby Forrest747 » Sun Jul 21, 2013 3:46 pm

bdosborn wrote:How about a 12V LED light show? I'm thinking this would be cool on the arch or underneath the tear like Rocky did:

Weatherproof RGB 12V LED Tape

12V LED Controller

Image

Bruce



Oh i like that one. I also found out that the bugs out in teh wild can see LED lights. I guess its teh domestic ones that cant.
"All the success on the trail can not compensate for having square headlights"

"I've got a fever and the only prescription is more cowbell!"
http://www.tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=37701 Build Journal
User avatar
Forrest747
Cowbell Donating Member
 
Posts: 1327
Images: 447
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 3:40 am
Location: West Valley Utah, Utah

Re: Outdoor arch light

Postby jstrubberg » Fri Jul 26, 2013 2:19 pm

BrwBier wrote:
Wolffarmer wrote:I wonder if those attract a better class of bugs.

sheeeeech

Randy

LED's do not produce UV light. Bugs see UV light only. So, sorry no bugs of any quality. :shock:
Brwbier



They do produce UV, just not in the most dangerous bands.

http://www.nouvir.com/index.cfm?ref=90200&ref2=9
The more stuff I take along, the more time I spend taking care of my stuff!
jstrubberg
500 Club
 
Posts: 688
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 8:26 pm
Location: mid-Missouri

Re: Outdoor arch light

Postby Bogo » Fri Jul 26, 2013 10:18 pm

jstrubberg wrote:
BrwBier wrote:
Wolffarmer wrote:I wonder if those attract a better class of bugs.

sheeeeech

Randy

LED's do not produce UV light. Bugs see UV light only. So, sorry no bugs of any quality. :shock:
Brwbier



They do produce UV, just not in the most dangerous bands.

http://www.nouvir.com/index.cfm?ref=90200&ref2=9

Actually it all depends on the LED. A monochrome green or red won't, but a white one may. Most white LEDs are really a UV LED shining on a phosphor that then changes the UV light into visible light. Some of that UV light gets past the phosphor. There are also LEDs that just emit UV light.
User avatar
Bogo
500 Club
 
Posts: 658
Images: 39
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2012 4:32 pm
Location: The land between two rivers.
Top

Re: Outdoor arch light

Postby JuneBug » Mon Sep 16, 2013 12:53 pm

Bogo wrote:
jstrubberg wrote:
BrwBier wrote:
Wolffarmer wrote:Actually it all depends on the LED. A monochrome green or red won't, but a white one may. Most white LEDs are really a UV LED shining on a phosphor that then changes the UV light into visible light. Some of that UV light gets past the phosphor. There are also LEDs that just emit UV light.


Would you translate this into what would make a nice (relatively warm) reading light? Some LED lights just don't seem like they are conducive to a positive reading experience and would cause eye strain.
"The large print giveth; the small print taketh away" Tom Waits
JuneBug
Donating Member
 
Posts: 569
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2010 9:16 pm
Location: Central Texas
Top

Re: Outdoor arch light

Postby GuitarPhotog » Mon Sep 16, 2013 3:22 pm

I use these LED eyeball spots for reading. They have a good color balance that isn't too blue for comfort.

http://tinyurl.com/mdul9l4

WEST MARINE
LED Surface Utility Eyeball Light

<Chas>
:beer:
GuitarPhotog
Silver Donating Member
 
Posts: 1662
Images: 55
Joined: Tue Feb 08, 2011 12:52 pm
Location: Grants Pass Oregon
Top

Re: Outdoor arch light

Postby bdosborn » Mon Sep 16, 2013 4:55 pm

JuneBug wrote:
Bogo wrote:
jstrubberg wrote:
BrwBier wrote:
Wolffarmer wrote:Actually it all depends on the LED. A monochrome green or red won't, but a white one may. Most white LEDs are really a UV LED shining on a phosphor that then changes the UV light into visible light. Some of that UV light gets past the phosphor. There are also LEDs that just emit UV light.


Would you translate this into what would make a nice (relatively warm) reading light? Some LED lights just don't seem like they are conducive to a positive reading experience and would cause eye strain.


Look for a color temperature of 2700K for mostly yellow colored light. 3500k will be white with a slight blue tinge. Anything above 3500k will be noticeably blue. Everyone has a different perception of LED light colors so YMMV. The inevitable gotcha is that while most people prefer the lower temperature colors, the higher temperatures are more efficient. Another measure you can look for is color rendition index (CRI). The higher the number, the better and more realistic colors look. Sunlight is 100. I look for a number higher than 80 but it can be hard to find the CRI. Most of the Chinese manufacturers don't publish it ( for obvious reasons).
Bruce

Bruce
2009 6.5'X11' TTT - Boxcar
Image
Boxcar Build
User avatar
bdosborn
Donating Member
 
Posts: 4214
Images: 450
Joined: Wed May 05, 2004 11:10 pm
Location: CO, Littleton
Top

Previous

Return to Camping Secrets

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests