welding tutioral

Ask questions about Harbor Freight trailers, or questions about building your own...

Postby Micro469 » Thu Feb 09, 2006 11:30 pm

http://www.aussieweld.com.au/about.htm

Heres a great Aussie site that has really good info :thumbsup:
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Postby bg » Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:05 am

My method tends to be start the arc and don't get the rod stuck on the process. I just think of it as applying caulk.... Speed and distribution.
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Postby D. Tillery » Fri Feb 10, 2006 8:37 am

That Aussie site has good info. I skimmed about the first 15 pages or so. It's worth a look, especially pg. 10 that shows problem welds.

OK, about gases. For our purposes there are three tyoes of shielding gases: Straight Argon, Straight CO2, and MIG mix 75% Argon & 25% CO2. There is a 4th for SS called Tri-gas, w/ Helium.
Straight Argon is typically used for TIG and MIG w/Aluminum Wire.
Straight CO2 is used for max penetration.
75/25 Mix is most common for all types of mild steel welding labeled NOS on the bottle.

Each looks different when it burns in the arc and leave different looking welds. An Argon arc will appear more green, 75/25 more yellow. I have never used straight CO2.

Check out this site for more info on gases and some photos of welds w/ different gases: http://www.millerwelds.com/education/tech_tips/MIG_tips/

Y'all probably have green lenses or auto darkeners. Color variations are more noticable w/ a gold tinted lens. If you are having trouble seeing, like many of us w/ age, you may have better luck with a gold tinted lens.
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Postby Outpost » Wed Mar 01, 2006 7:33 pm

How about this for a basic welding question... What type of welding is best and most cost effective for building a TD trailer?

Thanks (cuz im clueless on welding) :thinking:
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Postby D. Tillery » Thu Mar 02, 2006 7:18 am

There has been a lot of discussion here on that question. The answer is, " it depends who you ask."

Most will tell you that MIG is the way to go. Flux-core if you are working outside, solid wire w/gas if inside.

Do a search and you can find many threads on this. Search posts by Sum, McTeardrops and me. We participated in most of the discussions on welding. Sum is legend in these parts.

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Postby D. Tillery » Sat Mar 04, 2006 9:13 am

I don't know if another thread for welding equipment would be better but I guess I can just post this here for now.

So I'm at Home Depot awhile back looking for a jigsaw. Prices from $20 - $100. I don't know much about woodworking tools so I don't know which of these jigsaw features are big things or little things. You know, some of those things that either make you really like a tool or just bother you over the years. I just needed to cut some luan circles.

Anyway, I figure some of you wood guys might feel the same way about metalworking equipment. The threads on metal cutting got me headed this direction.

A little thing I like about welders, continuous controls.
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Above, you can infinitely adjust your voltage within the range of the machine, which will allow you to weld thinner metal or get the exact heat you need. The 10 setting won't even strike an arc. And you can adjust it while you are welding.
Below, your voltage settings are limited by the switch. No in-between and you can't dial lower than #1. And you can't change it while welding.
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Nitpicky, yes, but I'm talking about "little things" I wish someone had told me long ago. Both work great. Just something to ponder.

I hope this helps. Coming soon, consumables.
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Postby Miriam C. » Sat Mar 04, 2006 10:58 am

:o
I've always wondered how they do that.
Your right! A sticky on how to weld would be great. Might inspire someone (hint hint) to take a class. Wish we had senior free classes like JCCC in Lenexa has.

Just agreeing.
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Postby asianflava » Sat Mar 04, 2006 4:26 pm

Not nitpicky at all. The same goes for me with airconditioning in the car. The ones with just 3 fan settings bug me. Seems like the choices are either too high or too low. You can dial in the exact fan speed in cars with variable fan speeds.
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Postby Artificer » Sun Mar 05, 2006 4:56 pm

As far as a welding tutorial goes, I have one main addition. Its the importance of chamfering the parts to be welded. I've seen too many beautiful looking welds that have no strength. The bead is sitting on top of the metal. If you chamfer/bevel the edges of both pieces to be welded (butt welds), and fill the chamfers with metal, you know what your minimum penetration is. Considering that most people grind the welds flat afterwords, this becomes more important.

Unless you've got a large welder (like Snap On that D. Tillery borrowed), you will have problems getting good penetration with just the weld pudle. The little 15% duty rate welders just don't have the umph to burn in thicker metal.

My take on welding gases for MIG: CO2 is cheap, gives best penetration, but not the nicest looking welds on low carbon steel. Argon is for Al, higher carbon steels, and stainless. C25/C10/C15 (ex. 75%argon/25%CO2) is cheaper than straight argon, but has most of the properties of straight argon. You can't use it on Al.

I'm not a professional welder, nor have I played one on on TV.

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