Type of wood

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Type of wood

Postby Derson59 » Thu Jul 17, 2014 8:33 am

I am wondering what kind of wood everyone has used for their TD. I am looking at 1/2in 4x8 oak plywood. Would this make a good for the floor and sides? Suggestions are welcome. :worship:
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Re: Type of wood

Postby tony.latham » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:26 pm

I'll throw in my two-bits since you post has gone unanswered for a few days.

There are numerous different types of plywoods out there. So I'm not sure what you are referring too with your "oak plywood" (it varies between manufacturers on glue type and the number of plys). I assume it has an oak veneer on one side and of course I have no idea on the number of plys or the glue used.

If you are building a traditional teardrop, there is no reason to use cabinet grade plywood for a floor since it'll be covered by the mattress.

Although I seal all my plywood, all of it is either an exterior grade or is made up using glues that can handle moisture. Even the baltic birch I use can withstand two weeks in a bucket of water with no delaminations. I normally buy my baltic birch in 5x5 sheets but hiccuped once and bought a 4x8 sheet. It looked fine but wasn't near a strong as the 5x5 stuff. More of a cabinet grade vs. structural with thin exterior veneers.

I've built two teardrops and am in the planning stages for a third. I fall into the camp that uses sandwich construction. My walls are made of skeletanized 3/4" AC plywood skinned with 1/4" subfloor underlayment. The underlayment is solid core and manufactured for "moist environments."

Tony
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Re: Type of wood

Postby coyote » Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:39 am

I used 4x8 birch for sides and bottom. 3/8 thick. I put ribs every 8 inches and used 5x5 1/8 birch for "ceiling" and for over top. I used oak ribs for the hatch. It's not near as stout as many here, but so far, it pulls and camps just fine. Weighed in at 680 ( with a.c. for darlin' bride.) Don't think I'd change anything if I redid it. I would buy a pocket hole tool sooner ( Krag system). I got the birch from a smaller lumber yard, the big box stores did not have what I wanted, and the one time I found some 3/8, it was very inferior, although it was cheaper. My floor is 3/8 and I have had no problem. Good luck. Coyote
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Re: Type of wood

Postby George Taylor » Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:59 pm

I agree with not spending the money using oak for the floor. Now depending on what you want the outside to look like, would determine if it would be the best way to go. If you are going to pain or use aluminum or other covering, I would use something less expensive and then use 1/4 oak inside if that is the look you want.
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Re: Type of wood

Postby Derson59 » Mon Jul 28, 2014 11:11 am

I would like to keep the "wood" look on the outside and use 1/8" on the inside. I was thinking of a 1/2" 4x8 osb on the bottom with a 1/8" veneer finish on the inside.
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Re: Type of wood

Postby George Taylor » Mon Jul 28, 2014 7:48 pm

Ok. Since you want the "wood" look, IMHO, I would use 1/2"oak ply on the outside, then a layer of foam insulation, and finaly the 1/8 ply on the inside. As for the floor, I know some have used OSB for it, but I would rather use exterior rated ply and put a good coat of protectant on it. OSB tends to swell if and when it gets wet more than ply woods do.
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Re: Type of wood

Postby Derson59 » Thu Jul 31, 2014 7:40 am

George Taylor wrote:Ok. Since you want the "wood" look, IMHO, I would use 1/2"oak ply on the outside, then a layer of foam insulation, and finaly the 1/8 ply on the inside. As for the floor, I know some have used OSB for it, but I would rather use exterior rated ply and put a good coat of protectant on it. OSB tends to swell if and when it gets wet more than ply woods do.

thank you that sounds great. :thumbsup:
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Re: Type of wood

Postby ctstaas » Sat Aug 09, 2014 11:48 am

Hi All, I used 3/4" marine grade plywood. I planned to paint the inside and skin the outside with Al. Plywood is classed by glue type and the number of defects. The fewer defects the more $. An alternative would be to but a veneer. Black walnut, red oak and cherry is my favorites. It has been recommended to me to not use contact cement on the exterior because it will delaminate. I only used two spars for my cabin. The center of the spar needs to be 4' on center from the edge so the 4' wide sheets will land on the spars.
Enjoy, Chris
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Re: Type of wood

Postby noseoil » Sat Aug 16, 2014 8:08 am

Just in general, 1/2" sheathing grade ply or OSB (actually 7/16" now) will span 24" on center with 2X joists. Most residential roof systems are laid-out with 2' on center being the norm for roof trusses or stick framing. This allows for a 20# psf live load, 14# psf dead load. In plain words this means the roof sheathing will withstand a total load of 34 pounds per square foot of roof surface area with 2' centers. Your basic construction worker type with a hammer, tool belt, nail pouches, etc. can walk around up there without falling through just fine. A mattress will distribute the load across the area more evenly, so really 3/8" ply will work if it's supported properly (16" on center). I'm using 1/8" baltic birch under 4/4 poplar framing, with pink foam & 1/4" baltic birch for the decking. I'll cover the 1/4" with some 1/2" osb scrap while working on the inside, so I don't hole it, but the mattress will cover it once the trailer is finished.

I'm building with 3/4" exterior grade fir plywood "skeletonized" panels for the walls, 3/4" foam insulation to fill the voids in the 3/4", 1/8" baltic birch inside & outside for skins. This will then get skinned with aluminum or fiberglass & paint, haven't decided, since I'm not there yet. The 3/4" sides will be cut down to 1 1/2" for the skeleton's ribs. This will give plenty of strength for through-fastening of the walls to the cabinets with screws & glue, light fixture attachments, doors, 3/4" roof slats, etc. It needs to be strong, but it needs to be light as well.
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Re: Type of wood

Postby ChasCABQ » Tue Sep 30, 2014 3:46 pm

Hope I'm not too late to comment. After browsing the site posts and meeting a local builder (he's made 3 so far) I've revised my initial plans and am going in this direction for low weight and durability. Cost of quality materials is not an issue.

Floor to be untreated 1/2" marine plywood right on Northern Tool trailer. Not a lot of rain where I live so I'm okay with leaving it bare.

Walls: 1/2" marine plywood

Roof and hatch: 1/8" baltic birch plywood over plywood shapes and poplar spars.

All panel connections to be inside using wood or metal cleats every foot or so. Also will have interior shelving to provide lateral support.

I will fiberglass and epoxy all exterior joints then apply quality topside marine paint.

I wanted to do an epoxy and varnish woody but decided it was more effort, cost, and maintenance than desired.
Last edited by ChasCABQ on Thu Oct 09, 2014 9:23 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Type of wood

Postby mikeschn » Tue Sep 30, 2014 5:25 pm

I used Arauco Plywood from Menards. I like that it has water resistant glue in the laminate.

However, it's still wood, and it still needs to be sealed.

Mikeā€¦
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Re: Type of wood

Postby haha49 » Thu Jun 02, 2016 9:14 pm

Marine grade is better for the floor less air space more Lazer of wood for the thickness most marine plywood is 5 layers thick vs 3. It's more flexible and less weight so for floors it's a better option. Side walls can be cheaper cut them out and stuff foam in then a thin finishing type of wood for look you want. Makes the wall strong
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