Do cleaning.

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Do cleaning.

Postby slowcowboy » Thu Sep 13, 2012 8:35 pm

dumb. I know but hows the best way to clean a dutch owen after you done eating the food you cooked in it?

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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby bobhenry » Fri Sep 14, 2012 6:10 am

Answer one.... Remove the parchment or foil liner, wipe with a damp cloth ,oil ,and store

Answer two.... For the purist that don't use liners I use the same tactic as with my cast iron skillets. Fill with water and raise to a boil. This softens the baked on food and makes it far easier to remove. I use a green scotch bright pad to scrub with however a ball of aluminum foil or even a mesh onion bag will serve you well also.

After cleaning dry the cast on the fire or a burner until the water is gone. Coat with a light coating of oil all over the pot and lid and store with the lid slightly ajar ( I roll a paper towel and drape it over the edge between oven and lid so the interior can breath a bit)
Last edited by bobhenry on Fri Sep 14, 2012 6:18 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby eaglesdare » Fri Sep 14, 2012 6:15 am

bobhenry wrote:Answer one.... Remove the parchment or foil liner, wipe with a damp cloth ,oil ,and store



+1
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby bc toys » Fri Sep 14, 2012 10:04 am

Yes fill about 3/4 with water bring to boil get a brush with long handle and skrub it then, riance and oil. Like Bob Henry said store with lid and paper towel gapage never use dish soap or any kind of soap if you do you'll have to reseason it. Oh I keep a brass wire brush in my cookware for cleaning the stuff that don't come out with a reg. brush. I like to heat it tell I see a light smoke coming off it so that way i know it is good and dry and when I hit it with oil {pam stay} it gets in the pours good.
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby sagebrush » Sat Sep 15, 2012 7:44 am

Let your (Angie's) dogs take care of the cleaning. :shock:

:lol: Sorry, I just had to say it. :lol: The dogs made me :lol:
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby slowcowboy » Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:52 am

I fed them boys at the koa in lava hot springs will, them dogs can eat just about any thing they about cleaned me out of my eggs and grilled cheese sandwhiches at breakfast there!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby Angiewy » Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:39 pm

My dogs do a great job pre-rinsing the dishes, but after everything I've seen them eat, I'd especially want to sanitize the dishes after! :R :P :P :drofl: :drofl:
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby S. Heisley » Fri Mar 08, 2013 9:46 pm

I just read this in the First magazine dated March 18th, page 88:

Rust-proof a cast-iron skillet
Guarantee your trusty skillet says rust-free by wiping it with a damp, used black tea bag after every cooking session. The tea's tannins will coat the pan with an invisible protective layer that prevents rust-causing oxidation.


Okay, don't shoot the messanger! ...........If anyone tries this, please let us know how it works! :)
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby GerryS » Sun Mar 10, 2013 8:09 am

S. Heisley wrote:I just read this in the First magazine dated March 18th, page 88:

Rust-proof a cast-iron skillet
Guarantee your trusty skillet says rust-free by wiping it with a damp, used black tea bag after every cooking session. The tea's tannins will coat the pan with an invisible protective layer that prevents rust-causing oxidation.


Okay, don't shoot the messanger! ...........If anyone tries this, please let us know how it works! :)


Seems to be you'll be spreading bacteria around. Unless you are a single use type or pour your tea from a kettle.

I'll stick to oil, or Bette yet, beeswax. I stopped seasoning with oil last year. Beeswax as a seasoning agent leaves cast iron slicker than teflon. Flipping eggs is almost hard to do....truly amazing. And no, it doesn't making thins taste like honey. You get a hit of honey smell when you first melt the wax, but the taste isn't there. Also, make sure you use 100% and don't have any soy filler.
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby S. Heisley » Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:22 pm

GerryS wrote:
S. Heisley wrote:I just read this in the First magazine dated March 18th, page 88:

Rust-proof a cast-iron skillet
Guarantee your trusty skillet says rust-free by wiping it with a damp, used black tea bag after every cooking session. The tea's tannins will coat the pan with an invisible protective layer that prevents rust-causing oxidation.


Okay, don't shoot the messanger! ...........If anyone tries this, please let us know how it works! :)


Seems to be you'll be spreading bacteria around. Unless you are a single use type or pour your tea from a kettle.

I'll stick to oil, or Bette yet, beeswax. I stopped seasoning with oil last year. Beeswax as a seasoning agent leaves cast iron slicker than teflon. Flipping eggs is almost hard to do....truly amazing. And no, it doesn't making thins taste like honey. You get a hit of honey smell when you first melt the wax, but the taste isn't there. Also, make sure you use 100% and don't have any soy filler.


I don't think there'd be a bacteria problem, as long as you took the tea bag out of the cup before you added milk, etc. But, if that was a concern, you could probably use a freshly wet, unused tea bag. The beeswax is an interesting idea....never heard of that one, even for regular cooking.
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby GerryS » Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:59 pm

It's the double dippers (multiple use of the bags) that would be the issue.....yeh, single use bags shouldn't be an issue...
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby dmckruit » Fri Mar 15, 2013 1:47 pm

I use hot soapy water. Rinse and wipe it dry, then go over it with a paper towel and a little olive oil.
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby Corwin C » Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:53 am

dmckruit wrote:I use hot soapy water. Rinse and wipe it dry, then go over it with a paper towel and a little olive oil.


Due to the porous nature of the cast iron, if you use soap, sometimes you will be able to taste the soap in the food. Also, soap essentially dissolves the seasoning that we're all working so hard to create/preserve. Many people do get away with it, but my personal experience is that it's noticeably better without using soap.

Most of the time I can wipe clean my ovens/pans and I will use hot water to rinse clean. Dry thoroughly (usually with help from a little heat) then apply the slightest coat of oil to the entire surface inside and out. If the pan is glossy shiny after applying the oil, you've used more than is necessary. I try to get a semi-gloss sheen and it doesn't feel at all oily to the touch.

If it's being a little stubborn, bringing some water to a light boil and a plastic or natural bristle brush almost always takes care of it. On pans that the seasoning isn't quite done or for some reason something gets seriously stuck, vinegar or scouring with a little salt works well. Due to the pH in the vinegar, it can be used to sanitize as well (spritz and let it sit on the surface for a few moments before wiping with oil.) Vinegar will also remove the seasoning and cause the pan to rust if left on too long, but it doesn't leave a flavor on the pan.

I have used soap before, but it is usually for a pan that has been neglected and/or the seasoning has gone rancid and I'm trying to get rid of it. Rinse very, very, VERY thoroughly before coating with oil or the soap will prevent the formation of the seasoning by dissolving it from the inside.
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby dmckruit » Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:19 pm

Corwin C wrote:
dmckruit wrote:I use hot soapy water. Rinse and wipe it dry, then go over it with a paper towel and a little olive oil.


Due to the porous nature of the cast iron, if you use soap, sometimes you will be able to taste the soap in the food. Also, soap essentially dissolves the seasoning that we're all working so hard to create/preserve. Many people do get away with it, but my personal experience is that it's noticeably better without using soap.

Most of the time I can wipe clean my ovens/pans and I will use hot water to rinse clean. Dry thoroughly (usually with help from a little heat) then apply the slightest coat of oil to the entire surface inside and out. If the pan is glossy shiny after applying the oil, you've used more than is necessary. I try to get a semi-gloss sheen and it doesn't feel at all oily to the touch.

If it's being a little stubborn, bringing some water to a light boil and a plastic or natural bristle brush almost always takes care of it. On pans that the seasoning isn't quite done or for some reason something gets seriously stuck, vinegar or scouring with a little salt works well. Due to the pH in the vinegar, it can be used to sanitize as well (spritz and let it sit on the surface for a few moments before wiping with oil.) Vinegar will also remove the seasoning and cause the pan to rust if left on too long, but it doesn't leave a flavor on the pan.

I have used soap before, but it is usually for a pan that has been neglected and/or the seasoning has gone rancid and I'm trying to get rid of it. Rinse very, very, VERY thoroughly before coating with oil or the soap will prevent the formation of the seasoning by dissolving it from the inside.



This clip is from the Martha Stewart Show who had the president of Lodge Cast Iron on (see cast iron 101) below the main video that loads.

http://www.marthastewart.com/894249/cast-iron-show
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Re: Do cleaning.

Postby Corwin C » Sun Mar 17, 2013 11:45 pm

Cast iron 101 from above web page wrote:Q: What is the best way to season and care for cast iron? How should I wash it without removing the seasoning?

--Monica Ng, Davis, California

Seasoning a cast-iron pan gives it a smooth, nonstick surface that actually improves with age. When you buy a new cast-iron pan, the first thing you should do is wash it in hot, soapy water. Dry the pan thoroughly, first with a dishcloth, and then in an oven heated to 300 degrees for several minutes. You must dry the pan completely to prevent rust. Then pour about a tablespoon of oil into the pan, and rub it over the surface with a paper towel. Be careful not to use too much oil or the coating will be too thick. Place the pan in a 300 degrees oven for about an hour, then remove it and let it cool. Wipe away the excess oil, and your pan will be ready to use.

To keep a seasoned cast-iron pan in good condition, simply wipe it with a paper towel and a little oil after each use to clean it. If there are stuck-on food particles, use hot water and a brush or nylon scouring pad to clean them away (never use soap). If necessary, pour some water into the pan, and boil it on top of the stove for a few minutes to eliminate stubborn food pieces. Dry and reseason the pan between washings.


I agree with the above quote. When cast iron is new it has a wax coating to prevent rust (unless it's pre-seasoned.) That coating needs to be removed with soap (rinse very well) and the seasoning established. After that initial wash, soap should be avoided.

BTW - the pizza recipe on that web page is worth trying ... delicious and easy to do.
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