Seasoning with Bee's Wax

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Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby kookenotes » Fri Jul 24, 2015 9:57 pm

After years of seasoning my cast iron with the conventional technique using bacon renderings and Crisco, you folks have convinced me that I need to try the Bee's Wax technique that is giving such great results. I got some pure bee's wax and have a couple of questions. (1) - Do I need to clean and strip the existing seasoning off of my old pieces before applying the Bee's wax process? (2) - I just purchased a couple of new pre-seasoned pieces of new Lodge C.I., a 10" Dutch Oven and a square reversible griddle. Since they are pre-seasoned, do I need to do anything to them, other than washing and drying them, before I begin to apply the Bee's wax treatment to those pieces. I appreciate any of your assistance to teach this old dog new tricks. Thanks, Bill
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby bobhenry » Sun Jul 26, 2015 1:40 pm

SORRY FOR THE DELAY !

We were all at the CRA :applause:

Bee's wax is a no brainer just heat and smear. I know it just sounds too easy but that is it. After use and a thorough cleaning I have simple warmed the cast to hot to the touch and apply the wax much like your roll on deodorant. If you are storing it long term leave it a bit heavy no need to invert and bake or any of that hocus-pocus. On your next cooking use just warm water rinse to remove any dust etc. Now heat and burnish as it thins to almost liquid wax before you start cooking. I take a white cotton rag ( don't toss those old white tube socks) and wipe and burnish the excess just before use. Take the residual wax clinging to the rag and wipe the exterior and handle as well. I personally now use the wax only to cook , protect and store the cast iron I love watching it gets darker and prettier every use. For no stick cooking this is the only way to go. After experiencing this let us please have your opinion.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby kookenotes » Sun Jul 26, 2015 4:47 pm

Hi Bob - Thanks for the reply. I hope you had a great time at the CRA. I'm sorry I couldn't make it and get a chance to attend one of your seminars. I have a lot of experience with my cast iron skillets and dutch ovens but it has all been indoor cooking with domed DO's. I just bought my first camp style 10" and started out with a peach cobbler last night. It turned out great. I am assuming that I can just begin using the Bee's wax over the existing seasoning. I applied it to that DO last night after I finished washing it out and I can see how easy it is to apply. I be anxious to see how it turns out the next time I use it. Keep smilin'. Bill
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby bobhenry » Mon Jul 27, 2015 9:16 am

kookenotes wrote:Hi Bob - Thanks for the reply. I hope you had a great time at the CRA. I'm sorry I couldn't make it and get a chance to attend one of your seminars. I have a lot of experience with my cast iron skillets and dutch ovens but it has all been indoor cooking with domed DO's. I just bought my first camp style 10" and started out with a peach cobbler last night. It turned out great. I am assuming that I can just begin using the Bee's wax over the existing seasoning. I applied it to that DO last night after I finished washing it out and I can see how easy it is to apply. I be anxious to see how it turns out the next time I use it. Keep smilin'. Bill


You are correct in that I simply applied the wax over the existing seasoning.

WE are all looking forward to your unbiased evaluation on your next cooking adventure.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby Bleuday » Mon Jul 27, 2015 6:30 pm

I have been using the Bee's wax for about 4 years now, I have not had to strip my CI since I have started. I just reapply a light bee's wax coating a couple of times a year. Prior to starting the bee's wax, I could not cook eggs without using a lot of oil/butter. Now I can just put down a thin film of butter and then chase those eggs across the pan. I also love the way the house smells when seasoning. mmmmm. honey
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby kookenotes » Mon Aug 17, 2015 10:41 pm

I'm sold. The Bee's Wax seasoning technique is terrific. I started out experimenting with a #3 skillet that I use to cook eggs. It was recently stripped and lightly seasoned with Crisco. The wax made a world of difference and took all the challenge out of over easy eggs. I have now used it on most of my CI pieces. I have an old #10 skillet that I inherited from my mother that I considered very well seasoned and smooth. After applying the Bee's wax over the existing surface, it has given new meaning to the work "slick".

Bob Henry - You asked for an unbiased opinion of the process. I am impressed with the simplicity and can't imagine using any other method. Thanks :thumbs up1:
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby KCStudly » Mon Aug 17, 2015 10:45 pm

Awesome. I recently bought a stick of pure bee's wax from a honey monger at the local farmer's market; about the size of a snickers bar for 1 buck. Can't wait to try it out.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby bobhenry » Tue Aug 18, 2015 1:13 pm

KCStudly wrote:Awesome. I recently bought a stick of pure bee's wax from a honey monger at the local farmer's market; about the size of a snickers bar for 1 buck. Can't wait to try it out.
:thumbsup:


So get busy it takes about 6 minutes start to finish. :lol:

We need you to report in and let us know what YOU think.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby KCStudly » Tue Aug 18, 2015 2:23 pm

I think we're having fresh eggs for dinner tonight. I'll let you know. :thumbsup:
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby Jack Olsen » Tue Aug 18, 2015 4:18 pm

This is new to me. Is there a particular grade or type of beeswax for this application? Does it change the flavor of what I cook?
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby wagondude » Tue Aug 18, 2015 7:18 pm

No flavor change at all. You just want 100% beeswax with nothing added to it. Best to buy from a local beekeeper, but you can find it in the candle making supplies at Hobby Lobby. It is expensive there.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby Catherine+twins » Tue Aug 18, 2015 10:09 pm

Our natural foods co-op has it in their utensils department, hex-shaped bars in two sizes along with bees wax candles. Some also carry it in the herbs/cosmetics area, for making salves and ointments. Alternatively, fabric stores carry round bees wax bars for waxing sewing thread.

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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby GerryS » Thu Aug 20, 2015 4:42 am

Just be sure what you are getting is 100% beeswax. It's not uncommon to have other additives.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby Spotman » Thu Aug 20, 2015 12:45 pm

:thinking: I just went to the local bee man, he gave me a nice chunck right from his home made solar melter with the bees still making honey. Got home and tried it, maybe the pan was too hot, it melted/coated real fast and looked like water?? Was I supposed to let it kool before I wiped it? New at this thing, have only one 10" pan to practice on, has been seasoned in the past but needed it again.



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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby bobhenry » Fri Aug 21, 2015 6:09 am

You just wipe it on much like putting on your stick deodorant.

Hope you didn't melt the whole thing. :shock:


It just take a very thin coating and I usually burnish it in with a well washed cotton sock.
You can take the excess on the rag and coat the outside and lid top and bottom for a beautiful black finish.

I however, DO leave the coating heavy if I am storing the pan long term.
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