Seasoning with Bee's Wax

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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby GerryS » Wed Aug 26, 2015 5:07 am

I've never used a sock....hopefully a NEW sock. We've always stuck to plain Ol paper towels and a set of kitchen tongs. Don't get the hot wax on your fingers....it will burn you badly because it holds the heat and can't be washed off easily.

Also, remember it is flammable as a liquid...I can't remember the flashpoint, but you won't want a large "pot" of wax unless you know very well what you are doing and have a very good fire extinguisher on hand.

I've seen beekeepers melt wax in huge quantities to they can dip their deeps and supers, it's faster than painting. But that to me looks like a risk I'd rather not take.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby bobhenry » Wed Aug 26, 2015 6:03 am

Gerry you are just a germaphob ! Do you only use your bathroom washcloth once and throw it away ?

A washed white sock will leave far less particulate than a paper towel.

It can also be worn as a mitten protecting your hand from the wax.

Why must I always be wrong ?

P.S. the flash point of the wax is 400 F but it softens at 63 F so there is no need to even begin to approach the 400 F to apply the seasoning.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby DrCrash » Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:12 am

Ok Bob now that you have a thin coat of beeswax on the pan what do you do with it now ?

I ask because there seems to be two ways to use the wax. I am trying to figure out which one is the best way.

Way one is to wipe wax around on a pan then wipe it off and set the pan aside until you need it again.
Then you warm the pan add oil and cook in it .
When you are done you wipe it out add a thin layer of wax and set it aside until needed again.

Way two Is add thin layer of wax then toss in a oven @ 450 -75 degrees for 45 min.
Let cool apply wax and repeat until you are satisfied with the seasoning .
When done and cool add a thin layer of oil and set pan aside until it is needed for cooking.

Or is it a combination of both ways seasoning and after care of the pan ?
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby bobhenry » Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:35 am

Way one is to wipe wax around on a pan then wipe it off and set the pan aside until you need it again.
Then you warm the pan add oil and cook in it .
When you are done you wipe it out add a thin layer of wax and set it aside until needed again

Just before use I rinse the pan with clear water to remove any dust that may have been introduced during storage.

I have never oven baked a single piece of cast iron!

Well there was one exception Damned aluminum paint (polish chrome)

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I was scared to death it would crack but it survived well.
Last edited by bobhenry on Wed Aug 26, 2015 9:14 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby DrCrash » Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:48 am

Thank you Bob..
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby Nansplace » Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:55 am

I've recently started using my cast iron more at home and was just looking on the forum last night for proper way to use the beeswax. Heading to farmers market today in hopes of finding some. Also actively looking for a nice DO.
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby bobhenry » Wed Aug 26, 2015 9:17 am

Nansplace wrote:I've recently started using my cast iron more at home and was just looking on the forum last night for proper way to use the beeswax. Heading to farmers market today in hopes of finding some. Also actively looking for a nice DO.


There is a nice antique shop in Plainfield I have picked up a couple of pieces of cast iron there reasonable ! :D


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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby Betsey » Wed Aug 26, 2015 6:49 pm

Everyone has their own way of seasoning that works for them. :)

DrCrash wrote:Way two Is add thin layer of wax then toss in a oven @ 450 -75 degrees for 45 min.
Let cool apply wax and repeat until you are satisfied with the seasoning .


I have done it this way for the past 5 years, as it is how George H., the guru of seasoning with beeswax who started this trend in teardropping, taught me. The temp is about right, as anything over 500° will burn off the seasoning. Oven is a good way to do this because you can easily control the heat to get an accurate temperature. However, time-wise, I leave it in for about an hour (until it stops smoking), then turn the oven off and let it cool. Repeat as often as you want until you get the coating you like. You want to get a hard shell coating baked on so that it does not come off when you cook with it. In doing it this way, I usually don't have to re-season any of my CI for several months.

I also use a microfiber dish towel, as it does not produce any lint. I don't use any oil for seasoning after using the wax, as it really isn't needed. Plus I Iike the smell of the beeswax better. :)

Here is the process in George's own words:

Prepare your CI as you would for shortening type seasoning. Get it warm enough to melt the bee wax, getting a puddle. Soak this puddle up in a lint free cloth. Spread a coating of the wax all over the CI piece. Take a second lint free cloth and wipe the surfaces of the CI that you had coated.
In the mean time, preheat your oven to 475minimum, 500 max.
When oven is up to temp, put piece on oven rack set at middle of oven. Bake CI for 1 hour plus. Then shut oven off and let it cool till you can handle it. Repeat the coating and wiping process, return to oven reheated to same temps. Again let it bake for an hour. Now you can repeat as many times as you like obviously the more times you do it the better the "season coating". When you finally let the CI get to room temp, note how black it is, and how hard and slick the surface feels.
Now for fun and giggles give your piece a lite spray of non stick, heat it up, and fry an egg. When you go to pick it up and flip I'll bet you have a lot of trouble getting the egg on your spatula. You will chase it all around the pan.
When you clean this pice now, use boiling water to cut residual oil, or grease. Wipe dry, heat it up to dry, and then you are ready to store unit. Bee wax will not turn rancid, if your pot does stink, it is because there is residual cooking grease in pot, or on lid.


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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby GerryS » Thu Aug 27, 2015 4:50 am

And George is the master...I got it from him, and gave it to Bob, now Bob is the biggest evangelist of them all :)
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby bobhenry » Thu Aug 27, 2015 5:25 am

And I am still thanking you Gerry !
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Re: Seasoning with Bee's Wax

Postby GerryS » Fri Aug 28, 2015 5:23 am

Haha. Don't thank me....it came from CampInn forum. I don't know how we got along without it. My experience is it's as non-stick as Teflon and a heck of a lot tougher.

I've told several friends who gave up Teflon...and their experience is the same. Just remember, not for seasoning but for cooking, hot pan, cold oil the food won't stick.

You're quite welcome. Thank you for spreading the word!
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