Belt drive Bike

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Belt drive Bike

Postby dmb90260 » Fri Oct 09, 2009 3:15 pm

My local REI has a 3-speed belt drive bike marked down very nicely. I want a bike for short trips and tooling around vintage trailer rallies. There are no more 100 mi rides in my future and this seems to fit my needs but for one issue.
Has any one had any experience with these and changing the back tire if needed?
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Re: Belt drive Bike

Postby Fenlason » Fri Oct 09, 2009 8:44 pm

dmb90260 wrote:My local REI has a 3-speed belt drive bike marked down very nicely. I want a bike for short trips and tooling around vintage trailer rallies. There are no more 100 mi rides in my future and this seems to fit my needs but for one issue.
Has any one had any experience with these and changing the back tire if needed?


Changing that back tire should not be an issue because of the belt... hooking and unhooking the 3speed while not really a problem.. has more potential for problems..
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Postby Steve_Cox » Sat Oct 10, 2009 6:48 am

Found some interesting info on Wikipedia, there was also a history about it. Would be a good application for beach bikes.


Benefits

* Belts do not rust.
o Lubrication is not required.
o Cleanliness due to lack of lubrication.
o Little to no maintenance.
* Smoother operation. A belt's teeth completely engage into the system for decreased friction and increased pedalling efficiency.
* Longer life than bicycle chains
* More resistant to debris than chain drives.
* Quieter than chain.
* Some belt systems are more lightweight than conventional chains.

Disadvantages

* Scarcer at shops than bicycles with conventional chain.
* Belt-driven bicycles often incorporate proprietary plastic gears, which wear out more quickly than metal. Specially designed lightweight metal sprockets are available on some models and in kits.
* Derailleurs can't be used, so an internal-gear hub is used if gears are required.
* The belt cannot be taken apart, as a chain can, so a frame must be able to accommodate the belt by having an opening in the rear triangle or an elevated chain stay.
* Belts come in limited length selection.
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Postby oldtamiyaphile » Mon Oct 12, 2009 6:39 am

Steve_Cox wrote: * Smoother operation. A belt's teeth completely engage into the system for decreased friction and increased pedalling efficiency.


I realize this is from Wiki, but that one is particularly hard to believe.

Smoother operation? Yes, rubber will no doubt damp out vibration unlike the somewhat rattly chain. But everything I know about mechanics tells me that efficiency is lost compared to chains.

Complete tooth engagement means more friction. When adjusting backlash between gears, minimum friction occurs when the teeth engage just enough to prevent skipping.

Motorbikes do use belt drive these days, but a cyclist applies power quite differently to an engine. The fact that your feet 'pulse' power means a somewhat stretch feel as you pedal.

In a motorbike RPM is quite high so the belt can 'float' a bit on the pulley's which reduces friction markedly. As you slow you may find you notice the extra friction. No cyclist will be going fast enough to achieve this float.

As far as the rust issue, OK, but a drop of oil per week and neither will a chain. It's no fun riding in the rain anyway. Rubber on the other hand will perish in the sun. A good belt will have armid fibre (a bit like kelvar) reinforcement, so might cost a bit to replace.

Just some thoughts.
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Postby southpennrailroad » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:07 pm

http://www.bikeberry.com/product_info.p ... #chapter44

I plan on adding this to my bike. Just for the I can't make it back to the car reason.
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Postby dmb90260 » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:35 pm

There was one at Spamboree and it made it up the hill to the showers and pool with no problems. I asked Phil about it and he said it was not hard to install and most of what he needed was in the kit. He did have to replace the old coaster brakes on the back. His wife got it off e-bay.

I would like one but first I have to get tha bike to fit my frame. Not being able to accept the motor is one of the main issues I have with the belt drive..
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Postby dmb90260 » Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:12 pm

Image
I decided to go with this instead of the belt drive. I do not need anything fancy for my needs. A Schwinn but sold by a good bike shop and they will service it as long as I own it. This one is listed as an XL which my long legs needed. It will do just fine.
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Postby Fenlason » Fri Oct 23, 2009 2:37 am

dmb90260 wrote:Image
I decided to go with this instead of the belt drive. I do not need anything fancy for my needs. A Schwinn but sold by a good bike shop and they will service it as long as I own it. This one is listed as an XL which my long legs needed. It will do just fine.


are you comfortable on that seat? The nose looks high.
glenn

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Postby dmb90260 » Fri Oct 23, 2009 8:47 am

It has been adjusted to fit the tender parts better. :?
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Postby Fenlason » Fri Oct 23, 2009 11:05 am

dmb90260 wrote:It has been adjusted to fit the tender parts better. :?


most people would prefer the nose of the saddle lower for comfort on the tender bits.. but if you are comfortable with it that way.. that is all that matters.. :D
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Postby southpennrailroad » Tue Mar 02, 2010 9:30 pm

Got my motor today and it looks solid. I saw on You Tube that a guy says the motors are not well made and that all motors are made from the same Chinese factory but I looked at the welds compared to the one he had. I have to say mine looks solid. I now need a warm weekend to install this. I will photograph everything and post tomorrow. Also step by step build on the bike. I also have to state I bought the less expensive one but they sent the better one. I have no intention of using the motor all the time but only when I go to far and like in the past was unable to ride back without doing some walking. One thing like others have stated is that the instructions suck.
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