Cannondale Rear suspension

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Cannondale Rear suspension

Postby MountainBiker » Thu Sep 09, 2010 2:17 pm

Check out the new Rear suspension on the Cannondale Jeykll. It has two rear shocks. One for uphills and flowing trails, and at the flip on a lever on your handle bars, you can switch to a more agressive shock for downhills and tougher trails :thumbsup: It is called a DYAD shock
Not sure of the cost of the bike though :thinking:
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Re: Cannondale Rear suspension

Postby Fenlason » Mon Sep 13, 2010 3:51 pm

MountainBiker wrote:Check out the new Rear suspension on the Cannondale Jeykll. It has two rear shocks. One for uphills and flowing trails, and at the flip on a lever on your handle bars, you can switch to a more agressive shock for downhills and tougher trails :thumbsup: It is called a DYAD shock
Not sure of the cost of the bike though :thinking:


interesting.. the upper carbon one is about $8000. I am not sure if all the Jekylls use that technology [I will have to check]

With the old Cannondale.. we used to get to try more of this stuff out.. not so much anymore... I am not sure if it is the company... or just the rep we have now.. :thinking:
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Postby Fenlason » Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:08 pm

They don't make it in a 29er :cry: :cry:
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Postby JuneBug » Sat Sep 25, 2010 9:12 am

There are more early adopters here in Central Texas than you would think among the mtn bike racing community. The start line at any TMBRA (http://www.tmbra.org/) race series is full of 29ers these days. I bet we will see some of those Jeyklls when we go to Huntsville for a mtn bike race next month, if anyone is still racing on 26" wheels!

Tried to rent a Little Guy teardrop in Conroe, TX (close to Huntsville SP), so we could have our first teardrop camping experience at the race, but they rent them for a minimum of 4 days, and we just needed it for one or two nights (sob!).
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Postby MountainBiker » Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:29 am

A lot of racers up here in Canada are still on the 26"ers. Supply and demand may be an issue. Don't see a lot in the store's

The Jeckyl in Canada is going to start at $3,000 with the top end bike starting at $6,000, but I have yet to find a store that says they are going to bring one in.
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Postby JuneBug » Sun Sep 26, 2010 4:38 pm

I should clarify: Many of the regular racers have gone 29er, but many of the Elite/Pro who show up occasionally are still rolling 26 inches.
29ers and the ledg-y limestone trails here in Central Texas seem to have an affinity for each other. Then there is the Single Speed thing. And the Single Speed 29ers, and then the Single Speed 29er fixies. It is all good.
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Postby Fenlason » Sun Sep 26, 2010 7:18 pm

A lot of it I think is sort of a catch 22 situation.. shops are not apt to carry much for 29ers.. until there is demand.. and the demand does not really happen until you have enough people in the area riding them.

right in my area there are not that many yet.. but I think that will be changing fairly soon..
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Postby kennyrayandersen » Sun Oct 03, 2010 4:02 pm

Two shocks -- kind of sounds like a gimmick really. I mean with proper valving one shock should do it well. Also, there is a weight penalty for two shocks -- I paid good money to get the weight out!

I bought a bike just last year and I didn't even look at 29'ers -- maybe it's me, but if I were doing downhill, or something maybe, but I do a lot of climbing and theoretically the 26'ers still have some advantages. first I can get parts easier, second there is less rotational inertia with a 26'er and I think the steering will also be a bit quicker. I do a LOT of steep climbing over in Korea (where I'm working) so having a smaller, more nimble wheel/tire is important. I've actually read where the optimum tire size is 27.5 and I guess there are a few of them trickling out, but again, it hard to start something new as finding tires etc. is not so easy (and when you do the selection is limited).

I'm riding a Canondale Rize 2 -- it was already more money than I should have spent!
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Postby Fenlason » Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:06 pm

kennyrayandersen wrote:Two shocks -- kind of sounds like a gimmick really. I mean with proper valving one shock should do it well. Also, there is a weight penalty for two shocks -- I paid good money to get the weight out!

I bought a bike just last year and I didn't even look at 29'ers -- maybe it's me, but if I were doing downhill, or something maybe, but I do a lot of climbing and theoretically the 26'ers still have some advantages. first I can get parts easier, second there is less rotational inertia with a 26'er and I think the steering will also be a bit quicker. I do a LOT of steep climbing over in Korea (where I'm working) so having a smaller, more nimble wheel/tire is important. I've actually read where the optimum tire size is 27.5 and I guess there are a few of them trickling out, but again, it hard to start something new as finding tires etc. is not so easy (and when you do the selection is limited).

I'm riding a Canondale Rize 2 -- it was already more money than I should have spent!


It is not made for the same person that would be riding a Rize.

I personally would love a bike that climbs like my Stump FSR and descends like my Enduro

29ers If they don't have parts for them where you are.. then no they would not be a good idea.

We have steep terrain here also. 29ers have far better traction than a 26.. On rides I am often the only one that can make certain hills.

Heavy wheels don't accelerate as wheel.. but they hold their speed once rolling.

hmm do you know Grant Peterson? Formerly of Bridgestone Bikes..and now of Rivendell.
You should read what he says of his Pugsley.

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=274805

on the section labeled page 28... The Pugsley Conundrum

and do you know about the Surly Pugsly? They have 26" wheels but tires so big they are as tall as 29ers.. and they are almost 4" wide.
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Postby MountainBiker » Thu Oct 07, 2010 6:41 pm

I am always reading about the weight issue when it comes to mountain bikes and I still beleive my coach is right...want to make your bike lighter, lose 10 lbs.
The duel suspension on the Canonndale is a rather neat design. It is basically a larger shock with two flow chambers, one for your uphill riding, and one for downhill.
I haven't seen one yet, and no store locally will bring one in unless they have a sale, so I will have to wait till the bike show in the spring to see one, I guess.
As far as the 29er's go, the only issue I have with them is compatibility. I am an Enduro Racer (point to point's, usually over 50km's). If you are on a 26er, and you have flatting issues, at least there will be an unlimited supply of tubes out there. I always carry two, and in many cases have given at least one away in a race. With the 29er's, if you more than double flat, you got to hope there is someone else out there coming on a 29er, or you carry more than two tubes
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Postby JuneBug » Thu Oct 07, 2010 9:07 pm

MountainBiker wrote:I am always reading about the weight issue when it comes to mountain bikes and I still believe my coach is right...want to make your bike lighter, lose 10 lbs.

Saw a friend at a mountain bike race just after he had lost a substantial amount of weight (35 or so pounds), and he claimed that his bike now weighed "minus 10 pounds"!

Re: 29er wheels: the volume of a 29" tube also takes a lot more air -- so you have to be ready to pump a bunch or carry lots of CO2 cartridges if you flat.

Feel so much more secure and stable on the 29er, but do miss the amazingly zippy acceleration of my Racer X sometimes.
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Postby MountainBiker » Thu Oct 07, 2010 9:25 pm

JuneBug wrote:
MountainBiker wrote:I am always reading about the weight issue when it comes to mountain bikes and I still believe my coach is right...want to make your bike lighter, lose 10 lbs.

Saw a friend at a mountain bike race just after he had lost a substantial amount of weight (35 or so pounds), and he claimed that his bike now weighed "minus 10 pounds"!

Re: 29er wheels: the volume of a 29" tube also takes a lot more air -- so you have to be ready to pump a bunch or carry lots of CO2 cartridges if you flat.

Feel so much more secure and stable on the 29er, but do miss the amazingly zippy acceleration of my Racer X sometimes.


There is a woman on the Canadian MTB team that is about 30lbs heavier than the other riders. She says she uses her weight to her advantage on the downhills and hammers hard on the flats because she will be slower on the uphills. It seems to work for her.
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Postby Fenlason » Fri Oct 08, 2010 6:44 am

good points on the tubes and the air volume.

I don't notice the lack of zippy as much.. for most of my miles are on the road and of a tandem. A tandem can fly.. but acceleration is not it's strong point.

Also lately any 26" mountain bike riding I have done.. is with my Specialized Enduro. It is less zippy than my 29er.

I do notice on tight and twisty trails.. and following close.. other riders, they were constantly braking and accelerating... it was work to stay with them. Then I tried backing off 15 or 20 feet.. and found I did not have to brake.. and re-accelerate. I was able to carry my speed through the turns better. We stayed the same distance apart.

The benefit of a 29er does vary regionally. Here we have very rooty and rocky terrain.

I will probably stay with my current bikes.. but that Jeckyl is quite enticing.

hmm I do think I want a snow bike first.. :thinking:
glenn

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Postby Fenlason » Fri Oct 08, 2010 7:22 pm

I didn't think 29ers got flats.. :thinking: :roll:
glenn

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Postby MountainBiker » Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:01 am

Fenlason wrote:I didn't think 29ers got flats.. :thinking: :roll:


Twice in about 100 feet for a freind of mine :twisted:
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