Need advice

This is where the gals can have their very own discussions...

Postby Miriam C. » Thu May 27, 2010 10:49 pm

rebapuck wrote:I don't think you sound like you'd be comfortable with a gun. They are, afterall, a lethal weapon.

And what's the deal with concealing? As a bystander, I think it's my right to know you are carrying.


:lol: The laws in my state and I know Texas and Kansas used to allow people to carry in a holster and walk down Main street as long as the gun wasn't concealed. The concealed carry laws in these states no longer allow guns to be worn openly. I expect that allows for a lot less fear and violence.

It also restricts usage as it is forbidden to allow someone to see your gun.........No right to Know in these states.
:thinking: Um just how would someone allow you to know? Surprisingly there is no right to know in any state.
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Postby hiker chick » Thu May 27, 2010 10:58 pm

I don't think it's anyone's right to know if I'm carrying a gun in my purse.

And just as soon as I live somewhere that concealed carry is legal, I will get the permit to do so.



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Postby rebapuck » Fri May 28, 2010 9:47 am

Truly hope your purse doesn't get stolen.

My neighbor keeps a 357 under her bed. She's had two stolen in break-ins. Doesn't make me feel good that she's supplying some bozo with weapons.
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Postby Billy K » Sun Jun 13, 2010 12:03 am

I would not want others to know that you are armed and I was not.

That would make me a more likely target.

There is good reason to be armed; and better reason to ask questions about that which you do not know.

IMHO; NO ONE should be taught to fear a tool. Respect it, but not fear it.
A firearm is only as good as it's user. Same as a saw, Dremel, screwdriver, or a rock.

Classes are held somewhere everyday for those who are curious. Some are for women only, some for beginners and advanced classes as the individual chooses to progress.

People are indoctrinated into fearing that which they do not understand. Knowledge and experience, usually, overcome fear of things that "might" be bad.

Good luck with whichever you choose and by all means take your daughter with you; gun or no.
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Postby Alan and Lianna » Sun Jun 13, 2010 12:32 am

It is definitely a tough decision to make. I grew up with and around guns all my life, hunting with dad and cousins. I actually shot an intruder with a shotgun at 12 years old. It does and will affect you...

I believe the best advice you have been given is to get as educated about the pros and cons, usage, maintenance, laws, etc. And, definitely enroll in a reputible class.

It's like the old saying: "guns don't kill, people do".

Also, keep your 15 yr old in the loop with all of the education and dangers. I feel strongly because of growing up with guns, I have a very healthy fear and respect for them.

I will say a prayer for you and look forward to hearing more on how this situation works out for you.

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Postby hiker chick » Sun Jun 13, 2010 7:34 am

rebapuck wrote:Truly hope your purse doesn't get stolen.

My neighbor keeps a 357 under her bed. She's had two stolen in break-ins. Doesn't make me feel good that she's supplying some bozo with weapons.



Pity she wasn't home to shoot them.

Gun safes are a good idea.


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Postby robertaw » Sat Aug 07, 2010 1:28 am

doug hodder wrote:Owning enough firearms to be considered a "compound" by any media outlet...


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: And all those trailers you build...you are just downright suspicious!

I just bought my first gun ever two days ago. It's a 12 gauge shotgun and I'm all bruised up from practice shooting it. It's alot heavier than I thought it was going to be, too.
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Postby S. Heisley » Sat Aug 07, 2010 8:23 am

This reminds me of a true story.... My mother had a gun. She called it a 'shotgun' and carried it when she felt she needed to. She carried it when my oldest sister tried to sneak out of the house and elope with the boy down the street and when carloads of people would try to raid our blackberry patch on our vacant property next door. My sister carried it when our folks were on a trip and somebody snuck into the barn. When mom got into her 80's, living alone and her golden retriever died, she propped up the 'gun' next to the door to use when somebody she didn't know knocked. I never held it or knew much about it but I felt safer because my 'elders' had it.

Years later, I learned that the 'shotgun' was a 22 gauge rifle and it never had any bullets in it...Nobody ever even owned any bullets for it. :lol:
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Postby S. Heisley » Sat Aug 07, 2010 8:57 am

Something to think about...:

I've heard this one from a cop. (Planovet, feel free to chime in.) If you carry a gun in your glove compartment and get pulled over, some officers of the law get rightfully nervous and pull their gun out when you open the compartment door to get your registration or whatever.
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Postby Jazzy Lynn » Sat Aug 07, 2010 9:42 am

S. Heisley wrote:Something to think about...:

I've heard this one from a cop. (Planovet, feel free to chime in.) If you carry a gun in your glove compartment and get pulled over, some officers of the law get rightfully nervous and pull their gun out when you open the compartment door to get your registration or whatever.


I was told that if you do have a weapon of any kind with you when you get pulled over, the first thing you tell the cop is that you have a weapon and its location. Also keep both hands on the stearing wheel when you tell them.
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Re: Need advice

Postby PanelDeland » Fri Mar 16, 2012 9:49 pm

Personally I think everyone but criminals should be required to carry concealed or otherwise.For some reason I think courtesy and respect would come back into fashion.....

But that's just me.
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Re: Need advice

Postby kludge » Mon Mar 19, 2012 10:23 am

I know this is an old thread, but since it popped up again...

I am an NRA Certified Instructor for pistol, rifle, and personal protection. Depending on the class, we usually have between 40-60% of participants being women, and about half of them have not shot a firearm of any kind. The average class costs $100-$150. We charge $40, and includes ammunition.

The best thing that a "newbie" can do is to take the NRA Basic Pistol Course before deciding what handgun you want to buy. Several of my students come with a gun that they were "sold" and decide after the class that they would much rather have something else. We have around 30 handguns at any given class and the students end up trying about 4 of them, and most poeple have said after the class they actually prefer something different that they thought they would at the beginning of class. When you are spending several hundred dollars on a quality handgun, it pays to make the right decision the first time.

Unfortunately many women are steered right into a snub-nose, lightweight, .38 Special revolver, which frankly is not an easy gun to shoot for a beginner. However, if you can master that, everything else is cake. The most important thing though, whatever your choice, is to continue practicing, and practicing.

What kind of gun should I get? That is impossible to answer here, but a good rule of thumb is to shoot most powerful cartridge you can do comfortably, consistently and accurately. Here is something I put together to help answer that question:

http://www.danvilleconservationclub.org/whatgun.pdf

Shotgun, rifle, or handgun? For carry on the person, the choice is almost always going to be a handgun. For home defense the handgun works very well, but whatever your choice you will need practice to be proficient. A handgun is going to be less effective at stopping an attacker than a rifle or shotgun. While camping, in a trailer, a long gun (shotgun or rifle) is going to be very unwieldy because of its length.

A "pistol caliber carbine" (a "carbine", pronounced "CAR-bean", is a rifle with a somewhat shorter barrel, 16-18" usually) is a very good choice for home defense, it will also (generally) be lighter, and will have much less recoil that a rifle or shotgun. A "pistol caliber carbine" is designed to shoot handgun ammunition. It has an advantage over a handgun because it will be more accurate, and has a small power advantage over a handgun. The next step up from a "pistol caliber carbine" is the M1 .30 Carbine (a.k.a. US Carbine, Caliber .30, M1). If there is a "funner" gun to shoot I'll eat it. It's light and has very little recoil. The next step up from there is a semi-auto .223/5.56 rifle. The recoil is still low but the noise from the report goes way up.

A lot of people recommend a shotgun as the "best" home defense option. Most 12 gauge shotguns don't fit women very well, and 12GA recoils more than is comfortable. A
"youth" model 20 gauge shotgun is the best choice for most women. Even then, a shotgun can be quite heavy, my little (yet full grown) niece who is 5'2" and 110# soaking wet has a tendency to lean back to counterbalance the weight of a shotgun, not good. "Reduced recoil" buckshot loads are available for 12GA shotguns and the recoil is about the same as a 20GA, and an adjustable stock can make it usable for more than one size person -- some types even have recoil reducing contraptions built in.

The OP also mentioned "critter control" and it's hard to beat a little .22 rifle for that purpose.

As far as safety and the kids at home, that is covered in the class as well. Kids, like adults, need to learn firearm safety. And since adults are responsible for their kids, including criminal liability in most states for their children's misuse of guns, it pays to know your options. Store guns and ammo separately. Store them so that the are not accessible to unauthorized persons (kids and adults). Proper storage limits your liability. Remember that the lock is only as secure as the key and that no storage method will prevent a determined person with enough time and tools from accessing your valuables. A child in your home has a very long time - literally years - to find your hiding places. Out of sight out of mind is one thing, but don't fool yourself into thinking that you can "hide" your gun.
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