Gasoline. Dont do it.

Lanterns, stoves, etc... anything old!

Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby campmaster-k » Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:47 pm

It is my opinion that real gasoline has no place in Coleman appliances. Firstly it stinks and makes everything smell like gas. It leaves a horrible sticky varnish on everything. Dont do it. The little tiny number of hours you will run your camping stuff does not merit any saving on fuel. Coleman fuel is clean and stays stable for years without the gunk!

I just cleaned and fixed a "Duel fuel" stove and a military lantern both were all gunked up with gas varnish. The $25 you are going to save in your lifetime of camping and burning your lanterns is not worth it.

My name is Kirk and I am a Coleman nut and I only go through about 2-3 gal a year . I pay 12-14 a gal for Coleman fuel. So this year I would have saved $21 for the whole year to gunk up all my stuff and have to smell gasoline the whole time. Nonsense.
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby GerryS » Sun Mar 31, 2013 4:03 pm

Agreed! I tried it once justto see how it worked....abysmal failure is the best description. I only ran a small amount of gasoline just to see how it worked, so varnish wasn't a problem. But the stink factor is very high.
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby Gladtobehere » Sun Mar 31, 2013 5:45 pm

I agree also. But I no longer want to deal with liquid fuel so I use those tiny expensive propane bottles.
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby trccc » Sun Mar 31, 2013 6:21 pm

Long time user of Coleman fuel as well. Never tried or plan to try gasoline. Any camp store in any campground has Coleman fuel. As does any Wally World or any of the chain stores. Sure to find it when you need more...
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby Shadow Catcher » Sun Mar 31, 2013 6:41 pm

The stove and grill are supplied from a 25# propane tank. All our lights are battery (rechargeable) or 12V solar supplied LED. We have a couple of dual fuel Coleman's lantern and stove that we used tenting but that was for back up in case we did not have enough Naptha (Coleman fuel).
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby Corwin C » Mon Apr 01, 2013 5:59 pm

My lantern and stove are dual fuel, but I have only used coleman fuel in them. My theory (back when I got them) was that I would be able to use gasoline if I HAD to. It would take something serious to get me to put gasoline in them.
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby GerryS » Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:38 pm

I prefer propane for cooking as well, but lanterns are supposed to have a certain smell and sound....

I also like the idea of having fuel readily available if TSHTF....propane cylinders would be in short supply if we ever "need" them...
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby Zollinger » Mon Apr 01, 2013 8:50 pm

Generators don't last long either when you burn gas. Lanterns also run a lot hotter, or so I was told.
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby Weirdnerd » Tue Apr 02, 2013 6:28 pm

I prefer CF or Kerosene, as I camp between 8000 to 10000 feet, propane does not cut it, last time I tried, it took me 45 minutes to fry six slices of bacon, and another fifteen to cook the scrambled eggs,(granted, it was only five degrees F, but still) now I use a 400 stove ( the tiny brown CF one burner backpacking stove) and the little stove kicks some serious butt even at altitude, I am planning on teardropping on the Telluride area this spring, and I would not dare to go without a Coleman fuel stove.

I don't like gasoline, way too much "additives" for my comfort, even if the lantern or stove had a catalytic converter for the fumes.
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby GerryS » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:59 pm

How does standard charcoal and wood burn at that elevation?
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby Weirdnerd » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:39 pm

GerryS wrote:How does standard charcoal and wood burn at that elevation?



So far it burns OK, but I have noticed that is still burning the next morning, (closed fire ring, so no forest fires), good practices is to smother it with water before you go to sleep, unless you have a nice 15 feet of snow around it ( wide, not thick)
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Re: Gasoline. Dont do it.

Postby Corwin C » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:41 pm

GerryS wrote:How does standard charcoal and wood burn at that elevation?


It is only 15 miles for me to leave my driveway and get to 10,000'+. During the summer it is a relief to get away from the heat by going up there. My experience is that charcoal and wood burn quite well at high elevations. There is a difference, but I don't notice it as much with them as with the liquid or gaseous fuels. I do use propane and coleman fuel at elevation, but they all seem to struggle compared to sea level. My alcohol stove is a joke anywhere above 8000' (it just isn't up to it at all). Essentially, anything that draws air from the environment will need adjustment to get enough oxygen to burn efficiently (just like cars and people) and don't work as well. I run my camp chef cooker at 3500' with the air mixture adjustment about 1/2 open to get the advertised 60k Btu, at 10,000' I wish I could open it more and I don't think I'm getting 45k Btu out of it. It just can't draw in enough air fast enough to burn well. Similar experience with lanterns and coleman stoves.

Cooking at high elevation can be a challenge. Remember that the boiling point of water changes from 212°F at sea level and is only 194°F at 10,000'. Because the boiling point is lower, the cooking times go up. Cooking pasta, which might only take 6-7 minutes at a boil at sea level, might take 15 minutes or more at elevation. Not only are you struggling to get up to temperature, but you have to hold it there longer. Things which need to reach a specific temperature to be safe (meats) must be cooked a little longer at elevation (use a thermometer.) Frying seems to work about the same as at lower elevation, but when frying, the temperatures are generally way above boiling. Baking is really tough and often involves altering the recipe to get the best performance (notice the high elevation baking instructions on cake mixes and the like.) If I'm pressed for time at all at elevation, I actually pull out the pressure cooker and cook that way. If you have adequate Btu's to get it up to temperature, it doesn't change much from lower elevations time wise. A dutch oven with a well fitting lid can become a makeshift pressure cooker by placing a heavy item on the lid ... don't laugh, it works.
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