Building The Atma Travelear Teardrop

...ask your questions in the appropriate forums BUT document your build here...preferably in a single thread...dates for updates, are appreciated....

Postby bbarry » Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:01 pm

[quote="DMcCam"]Gee guys, 1/8â€
Brad

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Postby S. Heisley » Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:13 pm

I'd go with 1/8" ply on the walls but not on the floor. My floor is 3/8" on the bottom with 1/4" laminated on top of that. :thinking: I don't know that I would go much less than that 5/8" total, laminated together and epoxied; but, that's just me.
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Postby Wolfgang92025 » Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:16 pm

Dave,

I'm still working on my build. Used 1/4" on the outside and 1/8" inside with 3/4" framing.
It's a Woodie. Next one (if there is a next one) will be 1/8 in and outside.

My floor is 1/4" inside and 1/8" outside with 1 1/2" framing. It has a little flex in it when I stand up. Once the mattress is on top, the weight will be distributed over an even greater area and you will never notice it.

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Postby Ageless » Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:22 pm

If it's a bonded panel, each layer builds on the strength of the other. The interior walls of a jetliner are (2) layers of 1/32" fiberglass with a foam core. The floor that you walk on is almost the same except it has honeycomb rather than foam. Wayyyyy back in the 60s when Boeing was working on the first jetliners, ladies heels would pierce the aluminum used for floors, so they came up with the honeycomb which distributed the weight.
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Postby bve » Thu Mar 04, 2010 11:27 pm

[quote="DMcCam"]Gee guys, 1/8â€
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Postby DMcCam » Thu Mar 04, 2010 11:50 pm

Well, dang, 1/8" for the walls sounds like the ticket...how do you finish the wall to the frame? Do you run the 1/8" ply past the deck and cover the frame then laminate the aluminum to it? Or do you build the wall to be flush with the frame and just run the aluminum past to cover it? If you do that, how do you finish the bottom edge...? :?

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Postby bbarry » Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:24 am

DMcCam wrote:Well, dang, 1/8" for the walls sounds like the ticket...how do you finish the wall to the frame? Do you run the 1/8" ply past the deck and cover the frame then laminate the aluminum to it? Or do you build the wall to be flush with the frame and just run the aluminum past to cover it? If you do that, how do you finish the bottom edge...? :?

Dave


Two ways I see, because 1/8" ply won't work well using your diagram (not much to catch the head of your screw through the single layer).

1) Bring your entire wall structure down to cover your frame. This is what I did on my build. The downside is I have exposed end grain ready and willing to soak up moisture if the epoxy ever fails.

2) Your second idea is perhaps my choice...place your wall on top of the deck, then extend aluminum down below that to cover the frame. Apply a generous bead of sealant such as SikaFlex to keep water from getting in between the aluminum and the frame by capillary action. If it were me, I'd probably just pop rivet the aluminum to the frame and skip any trim. I like this way because there would be no exposed end grain.

You mention "laminate the aluminum to the plywood." If you haven't yet, start thinking about how you're going to attach your aluminum. There are two basic methods: glue or float. A search on this forum will turn up several threads and a multitude of opinions. My choice was to float the skin using only screws and trim to hold it on. I've been happy with the results so far.
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Postby bve » Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:53 am

This thread covers a few options http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?p=577661

This is the first image in that short thread, I'll be using a dado similar to what is shown there.

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Interestingly the creator of the graphic only has 18 posts and the thread is from late 2007 - a pretty great contribution for such a short stay.
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Postby aggie79 » Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:56 am

Dave,

I wish I knew how to use a drawing program, but I'll try to describe the detail I used. I used 3/4" plywood framing. The plywood framing extends below the flooring covering the frame (like the 1/2" plywood in your wall section.) I used engineered flooring as the interior finish. It starts at the level of the top of the floor creating a rabbet or ledge to rest upon the frame. You can see the rabbet covered with blue painters tape below.

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I removed the painters tape, applied PL Premium, and fastened through the plywood framing into the edge of the floor framing with deck screws to stand up the walls.

The insulation and exterior 1/8" plywood were glued in place after the walls had been erected. (I could have installed the insulation while the walls were unassembled, but I had not figured out my fixtures and wiring at that point.)

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Postby synaps3 » Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:36 am

I'm probably going to use the internal cleat, because I am PARANOID about letting the wood hang off the side, and risking moisture entry. With the internal cleat, I can fiberglass the bottom edge of the wall to the floor and have risk of water intrusion. I'm connecting my roof the same way as the floor. :)

I think any route will work well -- just make sure to always seal your end grain as much as you can!

I'm glad to hear you decided on 1/8". I just started building and went through the same dilemma you are going through. The 1/8" luaun I'm using is plenty sturdy enough, and still isn't nearly as strong as the birch you'll use.
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Postby DMcCam » Mon Mar 08, 2010 10:58 am

Thanks a lot guys. I'd really like some sort of rabbit joint like Tom's so there is at least a little attachment ledge from the wall to the deck. The 1/8" doesn't seem enough to me so I'm thinking of a little mortise...

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Last edited by DMcCam on Sun Feb 24, 2019 1:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby teardrop_focus » Mon Mar 08, 2010 3:09 pm

Dave, have a look at how Michael Westhoff built his version of a Cub Modernaire...

http://www.westhoffdesign.com/michael/t ... _plans.htm

http://www.westhoffdesign.com/michael/teardrop.htm

It's one of the nicer homebuilts I've seen.

:thumbsup:
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Postby DMcCam » Mon Mar 08, 2010 11:16 pm

Hey Chris, that's a sweet build that is. Looks like he went for a lot heavier build; 3/4 outside, 3/4 stick frame and 1/8 interior. I really like a lot of his ideas though. May have a few revises in the design...

Thanks a lot for the link, Dave
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Postby DMcCam » Thu Mar 25, 2010 10:10 am

I'm not sure what I was thinking with the last plan but, dang, the attachment of the spars was just wrong. I think this is a whole lot more correct. With this fix, I"m ready to go I think.

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http://www.vulcaniavolunteers.com/TEARDROP/TFPLN_IPDBIG.jpg

Cheers, Dave
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Postby synaps3 » Thu Mar 25, 2010 12:56 pm

Just for reference, the 3/4" insulation is closer to 1". I used the same wall construction as you, and ended up using 1/2" foamular. 1/2" fills the gap almost perfectly -- with less than 1/16" spare on either side.

Depending on whether or not you want the roof to be able to support any weight, you will NEED longer screws into the poplar roof spars. I'd use at least a 2.5" screw. For mine, each spar will get a 3" deck screw and two pocket screws on each side. The angled pocket screws will provide more rigidity than the horizontal wood screws. Then again, all my wood is either pine or luaun -- so I need more support with the lower-grade wood.

You should be able to build your wall framing with 1x2's or 1x3's. Anything else is overbuilding, especially on a tear.

Your plans are looking good though -- your new method of roof attachment makes much more sense, and will be much easier to implement.
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