Ultralight Stripper AKA "Less is More"

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Door mod for the Pico

Postby kentucky bryan » Sun Jul 24, 2011 8:34 pm

Turns out the width of my door is exactly the same as the Pico.

Here's a drawing that should get you what you need.

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Seems like as soon as we got done paying for the "Sins of Our Youth" , We needed to start saving for our retirement.

My Build at:http://www.tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?t=45264
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Re: Door mod for the Pico

Postby Larry C » Mon Jul 25, 2011 4:39 pm

kentucky bryan wrote:Turns out the width of my door is exactly the same as the Pico.

Here's a drawing that should get you what you need.

Image[/img]


Bryan,
Thank you!! that is what I am looking for....I think. What does everybody think about the change for my profile? Is it right for this design or is there something more appropriate for the profile you can show?

Bryan, for the 5" bottom radius, do I use the same center point to swing the arc 18" from the center?

Thanks,

Larry C
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Postby kentucky bryan » Mon Jul 25, 2011 8:05 pm

Detail for corner radius added.

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Seems like as soon as we got done paying for the "Sins of Our Youth" , We needed to start saving for our retirement.

My Build at:http://www.tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?t=45264
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Ultralight Stripper Update Jan 2012

Postby Larry C » Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:38 pm

I have done some work recently on my build. I had a bunch of 1/8" cedar strips left from previous kayak building, and figured I might as well use them in my build for the interior wall skins. I decided to just glue them together, and not glue them over thin plywood, just to save weight. It is not the easiest thing to do!

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Larry C
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Postby Colemancooler » Mon Jan 02, 2012 8:13 pm

that will look very nice when you are done :thumbsup:
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Postby aggie79 » Tue Jan 03, 2012 9:10 am

Very nice Larry! The wood strip interior looks super.

May I ask you a question about build method? I see you used staples to tack the wood strips in place. What type of staples did you use? Also, it looks like you stapled through plastic strapping. Is that because it makes the staples easier to remove?

Take care,
Tom
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Postby Larry C » Tue Jan 03, 2012 1:20 pm

aggie79 wrote:Very nice Larry! The wood strip interior looks super.

May I ask you a question about build method? I see you used staples to tack the wood strips in place. What type of staples did you use? Also, it looks like you stapled through plastic strapping. Is that because it makes the staples easier to remove?

Take care,
Tom


Thanks Tom...

I tried using a pneumatic stapler I got from HF, but I couldn't control the staple force by lowering the air pressure.. It ended up driving the staples below the surface which has to all be sanded off. The plastic strip was an attempt to control depth as well as facilitate staple removal.

I ended up resorting to my tried and true Arrow stapler with 1/2" staples.
I originally was going to go stapleless construction, but this isn't something that needs perfection, besides life is too short, as stapleless takes a lot more time. Also, the strips are just left overs that I randomly applied mixing grain, color, knots, etc. in as random a pattern as possible. Not the prettiest, so another reason for just using staples.

I was going to make a design template, use a router to cut the design into the strip panel, and fill it back in (inlay) with contrasting strips, but I tend to over think everything, and couldn't come up with a pattern I liked.

Actually staple holes are pretty easy to hide. A sponge and a bucket of hot water. Wet the surface with hot water, and it will raise the grain and close the holes. This is done before sanding. It hides most of the holes.

The panel will be glassed both sides, if I don't break it when I flip it over. :cry:

Larry C
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http://www.tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=35852
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Postby parnold » Tue Jan 03, 2012 2:11 pm

:thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Really nice!
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Postby Larry C » Sun Jan 08, 2012 3:59 pm

I shortened a Fulton trailer jack by about 6" to be more appropriate for my frame. The mounting plate weld was cut off on a lathe to release it, the tubes were shortened, and bead blasted. The mounting plate was re-welded higher up, Everything was then powder coated gloss black. It came out pretty nice. I won't be using the sand foot you see in the photos, I will be using a 6" swivel caster instead.


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Postby Larry C » Sun Jan 15, 2012 1:39 pm

Just received my new supply of epoxy and glass. I seal coated the interior cedar strip wall panel with epoxy. It cured overnight. I gave it a light sanding, then applied the glass, and epoxy. Hope to do the fill coat later today.

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Larry C
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Postby Facemeltingly Epic » Sun Jan 15, 2012 2:51 pm

That looks really sharp! :thumbsup:
Scot

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Postby Larry C » Sun Jan 29, 2012 6:30 pm

I turned over the strip panel and found it was better on the other side. So I scraped, long board sanded, filed the cracks, and finish sanded with ROS till it looked good. I glassed this side, and applied one fill coat. Let it cure for several days and sanded the panel that's why it looks so dull, it's ready for varnish.
After cutting it to the profile shape, I weighed it. It's 10# exactly. This is a panel made from cedar strips, and glassed both sides.
I am going to try using a ledge to lay my inner ceiling skin on from the outside, similar to Steve Fredrick's method, but working with what I already have. This will require me to lay my spars flat (the weak way). I hope this works for a 5' wide span.

Here's some photos from my latest work:
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Larry C
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http://www.tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=35852
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Postby Dewi » Sun Jan 29, 2012 6:44 pm

Amazing craftsmanship. Fascinated by the laminated frames you made at the beginning of the build, but then the floor and now this!

Cheers, Dewi
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Postby parnold » Sun Jan 29, 2012 6:51 pm

You're gonna have one helluva looker on your hands!

:thumbsup: :thumbsup:
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Postby angib » Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:36 pm

That looks like a nice home-made longboard. I watched some experts do the final fairing on a lifeboat and they had a six-foot-long longboard held by two guys!

In the boatyard I worked in, the boss did fairing of the bottom of racing yachts with a 20 foot length of 3" or so plastic drain tubing wrapped in abrasive roll - so the tubing would bend enough to follow the overall shape of the boat hull, but would grind away any local high spots. It required six guys to use it and one of them had to call out the moves for them all to follow. This nearly always degenerated into the caller trying to 'sing' the moves to a tune, with 'Swing Low, Sweet Chariot' being a favourite, but that always went wrong.

And now back to our regular programming....
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