CNC Build -- Right Galley Trim Panel and Left

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Re: CNC Build

Postby Weirdnerd » Sat Jan 04, 2014 10:47 pm

On this problem, you need to make a hook with an old hack saw blade and pull the dried up glue with it, is is thin enough to do a good job, then you can use a syringe to inject wood glue and clamp it, it will do wonders.

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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Sat Jan 04, 2014 11:16 pm

KCStudly wrote:can you slide a thin filet knife or recip saw blade in there to cut the glue stalactites?


and

Weirdnerd wrote:On this problem, you need to make a hook with an old hack saw blade and pull the dried up glue with it, is is thin enough to do a good job, then you can use a syringe to inject wood glue and clamp it, it will do wonders.


Good ideas! I was wondering what to use to get in there. :thumbsup:

Wierdnerd, thanks for chiming in! :beer:
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

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Re: CNC Build

Postby Weirdnerd » Sun Jan 05, 2014 12:39 am

You are welcome, for sheet metal work I normally use what is called a "chip chaser" to remove shavings between metal sheets after drilling, they do work nice for that kind of issues.

http://www.yardstore.com/browse.cfm/4,4471.html

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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Sun Jan 05, 2014 1:08 am

Weirdnerd wrote: ... I normally use what is called a "chip chaser" ...

Those look perfect for the job, and 5 bucks plus shipping! I've got a couple of things around the shop that might work. In case of fail, I have a fallback to fall back on. :)
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

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Re: CNC Build

Postby KCStudly » Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:56 am

I've never had much luck pushing glue thru a syringe (probably not using the correct size/type of syringe for the viscosity of the glue... TB2), but it is easy enough to use gravity. Stand the part up, spread the gap a little with a wedge or something, drizzle glue down in, smear it around good with your hook tool, pull the wedge, lay it down (if need be) and clamp.

For thin edges of delaminated plies I used a couple of cheap straight edge kitchen knives I picked up from Goodwill. One to pry open and the other to spread glue. Sometimes just the thickness of the blade was plenty wide enough to let the glue drizzle down in. I would just lay a small bead of glue along the gap, and it would go in; fish around with the knife on both sides and lay another bead along the gap; repeat until it seemed like I had it everywhere and I got a nice squeeze out when the edges were brought together, but that was a little more delicate work than what you may need. Technique should work the same, tho, I would think. :thumbsup:
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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Sun Jan 05, 2014 12:29 pm

KCStudly wrote:I've never had much luck pushing glue thru a syringe...

I had to use a syringe on the jigsaw joints on both sides. The first one 'cuz I couldn't get it apart from the dry fit, the second one just so I could get the TB2 into all the nooks & crannies. It helped on the first one to cut the TB2 with a little water so it would soak in. Gravity played a big role on that one You also need a big enough needle. My 18 ga needles were marginally big enough, 16 ga would be better. The full strength glue really needed a hard push.

I like the cheap knife idea. :thumbsup:

I have some reservation about just clamping down on the high spot, since it will tend to bend the baseboard a little. I may just let it go. I'll burn this bridge later, maybe after I see a a dry fit to the floor. :)
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Tue Jan 07, 2014 10:04 pm

I haven't posted in a few days, but I haven't been goofing off.

Thanks to KC and WierdNerd cheering me on, I stuck one of my Japanese pull saws into The Bulge, and managed to remove quite a bit of the glue stalagmites/-actites.
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Not as much glue hanging down, but the 2 sides have gaps when clamped. I'm not yet decided to glue and clamp. No rush. This can wait until final assembly or door install.

Here's the Cabin Cabinet area from the ceiling looking down.
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The aft bulkhead support is nice and square. 1-by lumber fits into the little slot for the faceframe (left), and the other piece simulates the cabinet bottom.

Here's how the end panel will fit after assembly:
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Needs a little trim off one side & bottom. Easy table saw cuts.

There was an area of interior ply between the ceiling line and the roof line (the attic? :roll: ) that needed to be cut off,
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but it's gone now. :) The deep cuts you see here are from the 1/4" bit. I will be following behind with the 1/2 inch for rough and finish cuts of the roofline and spar pockets. According to theory, the remnants of interior ply will be gone. You'll notice that toward the top of the picture, the cut area turns much lighter. This is where the door area bows up at the top of the door, and the cutter goes "deeper." It's not as bad as the bottom.

Meanwhile, back at the starboard wall...
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It warmed up into the low 40's today, so I took the opportunity to take the starboard wall out of the vac bag. No, it wasn't under vacuum all that time (3 days?). It was just too (adjective) cold to work in the unheated garage and the even less unheated Great Outdoors to get it out of the bag the last couple of days.

I missed gluing one framing piece.
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I used the dumbbell method of clamping.

I got a small start on wiring this wall today, but nothing picture-worthy. The left wall has all electrical going forward, the right wall has mostly electricity going aft.

I'm contemplating a LP gas line in the baseboard from the tongue box to the galley. Has anyone had gas pressure problems from long runs of high pressure hose? I'm also going to research how well copper tubing works for propane. Anyone have a link to a favorite thread pro/con? :QM

The CNC is temporarily down trying to fix the "Y-axis drift" issue. The Mach3 forums mention that some parallel ports have "issues" that might be the cause of my problem. I've ordered a PCI parallel board recommended on Mach3 support. We'll see. Not only does my Y axis drift, but the 2 X axis motors don't seem to say in sync, which throws the gantry out of square. This would be another manifestation of the "Y-axis drift" problem.

I piggybacked on Mikes preference for
mikeschn wrote:I hate starting in the middle of a toolpath.
not starting in the middle of a tool path and broke up my g-code into single features. Then, to avoid long travels to the place cutting was going to happen, I squared-up near the cut and ran a small piece of G-code. That's how I got the cuts done that you see above. Those cuts were only one axis, so once the machine is square, you're good to go. I am reluctant to cut the roofline curve and spar pockets until things get straightened out a bit with the computer/machine interface.

There's only the roofline/spar cut left and then on to the outline cut. We'll all get to see just what the finish profile will really look like. This is starting to get exciting! At least for me. ;)

Ass-uming that I get the issues fixed, the starboard wall should go much easier.
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

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Re: CNC Build

Postby dustboy » Wed Jan 08, 2014 12:47 am

Cool to see other CNCer's here, I was wondering if anybody was using CNC to build teardrops. Seems like an ideal application.

I too would recommend getting a compression bit, no more splintering. As long as you get your feeds and speeds right, you shouldn't have any broken bits.
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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:01 am

Good to see you join the thread, Dustboy! :beer:

dustboy wrote:As long as you get your feeds and speeds right, you shouldn't have any broken bits.

... and avoid running into obstacles. :oops: ... or forgetting to push the "Set Next Line" button. :x

I've broken more bits due to "oops-es" than I've worn out. I don't dare get in a hurry, and have to keep the decks clear. But I'm getting better (knock on wood).

So what kind of setup do you have, Dustboy?
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

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Re: CNC Build

Postby dustboy » Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:41 pm

We have a Camaster 4x8 in my cabinet shop. In CA our worker's comp runs about $650/mo for one guy, which incidentally is the same as a monthly payment on a 5-year lease, so it was a no-brainer. It mostly cuts nested cabinet parts out of 3/4" prefinished maple ply. Now and then we get a project with some weird curves or angles, and it is great for that too.

The first thing I did after getting it setup in was crash a $70 CMT compression bit into the steel frame...the Z-axis belt jumped a tooth somehow and I didn't realize it. Fortunately that hasn't happened again.

I've learned to check and double check, and anytime I'm not sure, my finger is over the "STOP" button!
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Re: CNC Build

Postby AlgoDan » Thu Jan 09, 2014 5:14 am

dustboy wrote:We have a Camaster 4x8 in my cabinet shop. In CA our worker's comp runs about $650/mo for one guy, which incidentally is the same as a monthly payment on a 5-year lease, so it was a no-brainer. It mostly cuts nested cabinet parts out of 3/4" prefinished maple ply. Now and then we get a project with some weird curves or angles, and it is great for that too.

The first thing I did after getting it setup in was crash a $70 CMT compression bit into the steel frame...the Z-axis belt jumped a tooth somehow and I didn't realize it. Fortunately that hasn't happened again.

I've learned to check and double check, and anytime I'm not sure, my finger is over the "STOP" button!


So true about the finger is on the STOP button, It is till the program is running 100%….for the sake of not crashing….. :thumbsup:
Here now but Camping later.............Dan

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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Thu Jan 09, 2014 11:27 am

dustboy wrote:... anytime I'm not sure, my finger is over the "STOP" button!


I was right there by the e-stop when I put that gash in the wall. If I'd had my hand on the button, it wouldn't have been as bad. If I wasn't there paying attention, it would have gone all the way across. It pains me to watch it, but here's the video:



(edit)One mistake on top of another. :( (/edit) Lesson learned.
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

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Re: CNC Build

Postby mikeschn » Thu Jan 09, 2014 5:53 pm

I did that several times when I was cutting parts for the sleeping pods. Since the pods were being painted, I just dug out the Fill-it from the Rot Doctor, and filled the gashes. Sanded it the next day with a random orbital sander, and it was as good as new.

Mike...
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Re: CNC Build

Postby dustboy » Thu Jan 09, 2014 7:05 pm

Yikes, I was more worried about your right hand!
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Re: CNC Build

Postby AlgoDan » Thu Jan 09, 2014 9:03 pm

Dang that was scary, glad all is fine….
Here now but Camping later.............Dan

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