Empty propane bottle leaks???

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Empty propane bottle leaks???

Postby southpennrailroad » Mon Dec 12, 2011 9:32 pm

Propane leak! :o

Weird! Saturday morning I switched out my empty tank as the furnace quit working due to being empty and the light on the furnace blinking telling me I was out. However after I switched out, I moved the empty to the outside rear of the trailer doors and during all day Sunday I was getting a headache and actually smelled propane. It wasn't until I smelled propane that I decided to go out and move the tanks (empties) away from the door. Today no headaches. I did nothing to the actual connected tanks or furnace. Just moved the empty tanks. Is it possible that the left open valve on the tank meant gas was escaping even with the tank not putting out enough for the furnace. Is there always some left in the tank and could it have been escaping?

Russ
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Postby starleen2 » Mon Dec 12, 2011 9:38 pm

all possible culprits - it may be a residue of a chemical called maleneosic that gives propane it's odor :thinking:
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Postby southpennrailroad » Mon Dec 12, 2011 10:13 pm

I think now that all propane bottles need to be stored away from any part of the trailer if not hooked up or at least close the valve when not using it or just storing it. :oops:
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Postby southpennrailroad » Mon Dec 12, 2011 10:15 pm

The last three letters in this name "maleneosic" describes the feeling I had "sic"
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Postby slowcowboy » Mon Dec 12, 2011 11:18 pm

yea, with a old stlye valve. new opd valves are supposed to be desinged to not leak a drop with the valve OPEN!

but not everything is mecanicly sound. anything can malfunction.

slow.
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Postby southpennrailroad » Tue Dec 13, 2011 6:08 am

slowcowboy wrote:yea, with a old stlye valve. new opd valves are supposed to be desinged to not leak a drop with the valve OPEN!

but not everything is mecanicly sound. anything can malfunction.

slow.

Yeah this was my experience. so I won't park it so close to my doors any longer. My sleeping area is right next to the back doors not that that matters as the whole trailer smelled from it. Just wanted others to think twice about putting empties that close.
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Postby Mikka » Tue Dec 13, 2011 6:31 am

starleen2 wrote:all possible culprits - it may be a residue of a chemical called maleneosic that gives propane it's odor :thinking:

Yes, last summer, I cut open a couple of old tanks that had been left unattended for more than 2 years with the valves open. I smelled up my garage for over a week. The smell is so embedded in the metal that it smells forever.
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Postby Tumbleweed_Tex » Tue Dec 13, 2011 9:09 am

southpennrailroad wrote:Is it possible that the left open valve on the tank meant gas was escaping even with the tank not putting out enough for the furnace. Is there always some left in the tank and could it have been escaping?

Russ


If the outside temperature was low enough, any traces of residual propane liquid in the “emptyâ€
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Postby Dale M. » Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:02 am

[quote="Tumbleweed_Tex"]

I am unfamiliar with maleneosic, and am unable to find a definition or a listing for it in the national Material Safety Data Sheet database.

In my practical experience, ethyl mercaptan (CAS NUMBER: 75-08-1) is the odorant added to consumer grade propane. Since mercaptan can be detected by humans in concentrations of 0.001 parts per million, empty tanks tend to smell the same as full ones, which is why I suspect you smelled “gasâ€
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Postby southpennrailroad » Tue Dec 13, 2011 8:41 pm

Tumbleweed_Tex wrote:
southpennrailroad wrote:Is it possible that the left open valve on the tank meant gas was escaping even with the tank not putting out enough for the furnace. Is there always some left in the tank and could it have been escaping?

Russ


If the outside temperature was low enough, any traces of residual propane liquid in the “emptyâ€
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Postby Mikka » Wed Dec 14, 2011 7:54 am

Here in Canada propane or any other gas concentrate in colder weather and expand in the heat. Explosions of gaz cylinders occur under extreme heat not cold. As a matter of fact, I keep a small canister of butane gas in my unheated garage and last night I had to bring it inside to warm it before being able to properly fill up one of those goose neck lighter.

As for propane gas, it is heavier than air and at 31 farenheit it will settle at ground level, Because of that it is hard to believe it actually entered the camper unless of a strong draft pulling it inside. At 31, it is safe to think that the door was closed and the probability of intoxication that way is nil.

My belief is that when you changed the tanks, you may have let gas escape or touch the valves close to the spout and the chemical it contains may have ended on your hands. You may have reacted to the the absorbtion of the chemicals through your skin. Always a good idea to wear glove or wash hands after srcewing around with chemicals.
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Postby southpennrailroad » Wed Dec 14, 2011 8:47 pm

Mikka wrote:Here in Canada propane or any other gas concentrate in colder weather and expand in the heat. Explosions of gaz cylinders occur under extreme heat not cold. As a matter of fact, I keep a small canister of butane gas in my unheated garage and last night I had to bring it inside to warm it before being able to properly fill up one of those goose neck lighter.

As for propane gas, it is heavier than air and at 31 farenheit it will settle at ground level, Because of that it is hard to believe it actually entered the camper unless of a strong draft pulling it inside. At 31, it is safe to think that the door was closed and the probability of intoxication that way is nil.

My belief is that when you changed the tanks, you may have let gas escape or touch the valves close to the spout and the chemical it contains may have ended on your hands. You may have reacted to the the absorbtion of the chemicals through your skin. Always a good idea to wear glove or wash hands after srcewing around with chemicals.


Ok so I say I got it all wrong but the results was bad and I found that by moving the bottle helped greatly. ;)
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Postby Mikka » Fri Dec 16, 2011 7:47 pm

southpennrailroad wrote:
Mikka wrote:Here in Canada propane or any other gas concentrate in colder weather and expand in the heat. Explosions of gaz cylinders occur under extreme heat not cold. As a matter of fact, I keep a small canister of butane gas in my unheated garage and last night I had to bring it inside to warm it before being able to properly fill up one of those goose neck lighter.

As for propane gas, it is heavier than air and at 31 farenheit it will settle at ground level, Because of that it is hard to believe it actually entered the camper unless of a strong draft pulling it inside. At 31, it is safe to think that the door was closed and the probability of intoxication that way is nil.

My belief is that when you changed the tanks, you may have let gas escape or touch the valves close to the spout and the chemical it contains may have ended on your hands. You may have reacted to the the absorbtion of the chemicals through your skin. Always a good idea to wear glove or wash hands after srcewing around with chemicals.


Ok so I say I got it all wrong but the results was bad and I found that by moving the bottle helped greatly. ;)


Please read again... unless of a strong draft... but you're right...what the hell do i know about gas after all... other than having a criminal fire investigation certification and worked in that domain for + 20 years. :thumbdown: yeah a looser, that's what i am... just trying to help you, buddy, based on my knowledge of gas... If I would have not known a thing I would not have volunteered to help you understand your issue. Sooorrrry for trying to be smarter than you.
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Postby southpennrailroad » Fri Dec 16, 2011 11:26 pm

Mikka wrote:
southpennrailroad wrote:
Mikka wrote:Here in Canada propane or any other gas concentrate in colder weather and expand in the heat. Explosions of gaz cylinders occur under extreme heat not cold. As a matter of fact, I keep a small canister of butane gas in my unheated garage and last night I had to bring it inside to warm it before being able to properly fill up one of those goose neck lighter.

As for propane gas, it is heavier than air and at 31 farenheit it will settle at ground level, Because of that it is hard to believe it actually entered the camper unless of a strong draft pulling it inside. At 31, it is safe to think that the door was closed and the probability of intoxication that way is nil.

My belief is that when you changed the tanks, you may have let gas escape or touch the valves close to the spout and the chemical it contains may have ended on your hands. You may have reacted to the the absorbtion of the chemicals through your skin. Always a good idea to wear glove or wash hands after srcewing around with chemicals.


Ok so I say I got it all wrong but the results was bad and I found that by moving the bottle helped greatly. ;)


Please read again... unless of a strong draft... but you're right...what the hell do i know about gas after all... other than having a criminal fire investigation certification and worked in that domain for + 20 years. :thumbdown: yeah a looser, that's what i am... just trying to help you, buddy, based on my knowledge of gas... If I would have not known a thing I would not have volunteered to help you understand your issue. Sooorrrry for trying to be smarter than you.


I think you got my last post it wrong. I greatly appreciate your help. That is why I have added the wink. I am the one who got it wrong. I am the one who needed the advise and clarification.
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