RV Stove VS Camping Stove

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RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby travist » Fri Aug 17, 2018 6:58 pm

So I'm shopping around for a stove for my galley kitchen. I'm doing a fairly sizeable standy, and plan on having installed propane lines etc. But I've noticed many of the RV stove tops, drop in etc have burners that are around 5000 btuh or if they have a high output one 9000 btuh, but you move over to portable stoves like the coleman and commonly see 10000 btuh.

Is there a reason for this? Why wouldn't I just then figure out how to install the camping stove with 10000 btuh elements instead of getting an RV one. I'm just wondering if there is something I'm missing that makes it unsafe to do those others.
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby Shadow Catcher » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:25 pm

We have an Atwood three burner and Nancy has no complaints, the true test :)
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby GuitarPhotog » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:35 pm

Camping stoves typically have their own regulator from tank-pressure to ???pressure. RV stoves run at a standard pressure (11" W.C.) and the regulator is located at the tank so the plumbing operates at very low pressure. The lack of pressure often limits performance, but not always.

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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby Ottsville » Fri Aug 17, 2018 8:12 pm

Chas is correct, camp stoves have their own regulators which are somewhere above an 11" WC that is your standard propane regulator so you get a higher output. This is kind of a pain if you piping multiple propane devices in your camper.
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby Andrew Herrick » Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:11 am

While there is merit to both solutions, I lean on the side of a camping stove. There is a greater accessible variety in style, size and quality of portable camping stoves than of RV drop-in stoves. You can spend $40 on a Coleman or $300 on a Partner Steel. Plus, portable stoves are just that - portable! Why limit yourself to cooking in your galley on a 72-degree summer evening? Also, camping stoves can be removed from counters to make room for meal preparation. And lastly, drop-in stoves do best with at least some "hard" plumbing. Camping stoves run fine off 1-lb propane cylinders, or you can install a small hatch in your wall and run a quick-disconnect line to a tongue-mounted propane cylinder whenever it's necessary. If all you're wanting to do is run a stove, that's easier than working with copper flare fittings or threaded black iron piping, IMHO (if you're running a hot water heater, my last point is moot).
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby travist » Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:58 am

I will have a propane heater, a propane water heater, and a stove, so I will definitely be running lines.

Hmm interesting, so the regulated lines may be reducing performance somewhat. Am I right in understanding its a fairly big pain to do different types of lines so that I could do a camping stove? I'm not bothered with being unable to take it out of the counter and make it portable, I still own a portable one I could bring along if I felt that would be helpful.
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby friz » Sat Aug 18, 2018 2:38 am

Andrew Herrick wrote:While there is merit to both solutions, I lean on the side of a camping stove. There is a greater accessible variety in style, size and quality of portable camping stoves than of RV drop-in stoves. You can spend $40 on a Coleman or $300 on a Partner Steel. Plus, portable stoves are just that - portable! Why limit yourself to cooking in your galley on a 72-degree summer evening? Also, camping stoves can be removed from counters to make room for meal preparation. And lastly, drop-in stoves do best with at least some "hard" plumbing. Camping stoves run fine off 1-lb propane cylinders, or you can install a small hatch in your wall and run a quick-disconnect line to a tongue-mounted propane cylinder whenever it's necessary. If all you're wanting to do is run a stove, that's easier than working with copper flare fittings or threaded black iron piping, IMHO (if you're running a hot water heater, my last point is moot).
My galley was facing the wrong direction for this view.Image

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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby working on it » Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:48 pm

Andrew Herrick wrote:While there is merit to both solutions, I lean on the side of a camping stove. There is a greater accessible variety in style, size and quality of portable camping stoves than of RV drop-in stoves. You can spend $40 on a Coleman or $300 on a Partner Steel. Plus, portable stoves are just that - portable! Why limit yourself to cooking in your galley on a 72-degree summer evening? Also, camping stoves can be removed from counters to make room for meal preparation....
  • I can see why one might want a stove/cooktop installed inside their camper...our 20-ft travel trailer has one (with the necessary ventahood over it), and it is perfect for the job, in a trailer you can spend several days inside, without ever going outside, if that's what you want.
  • But, in a smaller trailer, and/or standy, if cooking outdoors is what you want (nobody grills a steak inside if they can do it outside), the venerable Coleman white gas stove (there is nothing like the aroma of white gas cooking, at least to me) is what you want, plus a mini-sized charcoal grill. If I were building a small standy, I would install a stainless, or phenolic heat-resistant countertop, without the usual cooktop installed, and a similar shield on the wall behind, leaving a space to place your Coleman, or mini-grille on top. Of course, having a window close-by, an overhead ventahood on, and a nearby fire-extinguisher would be required, too. And a charcoal starter canister (initially used outside the trailer, to preclude tall flame-ups), for the small grille (my choice is the Ikea Korpon grill, which only needs a canister full, of briquettes).
  • Using these items, you could cook inside or outside, and still be able to use the bare countertop space for food prep before the fires are lit; there would be no propane lines to install and have to check for leaks before every trip, and having that bare spot inside the trailer would be golden, for many other uses between mealtimes.
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby Ottsville » Sat Aug 18, 2018 1:19 pm

Even a lower output RV stove heats up a larger RV pretty quickly. Cooking in our rpod was almost unbearable unless the ac was running. I can't imagine what a high output stove in a standy would be like...
I'm firmly in the camp stove camp. Even when we use our TT I prefer to cook outside over the Camp Chef 2 burner camp stove. Run your propane camp stove off of a bulk tank so you don't have to buy the 1lb tanks. (Or refill your 1lb tanks).
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby Socal Tom » Sat Aug 18, 2018 2:48 pm

I've had issues with cooking outside in the wind with my Camp Chef oven/stove which has 7500 BTU burners. However I can pick it up and put it in the back of my jeep and it worked out fine. I've also had issues with it boiling stuff instead of simmering on low. So if its indoors, I'd go with the lower btu. Probably take longer to boil stuff, but the low flame should work better. If outside, I'd go with the 10K burner for better wind and cold tolerance.
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby travist » Sat Aug 18, 2018 10:33 pm

So I will have a rear hatch galley like most tear drops, so if I install a stove into the counter it will still be used outside. I have no plans on using it inside, nor space to us it in there.

I will definitely be carrying a fire extinguisher, but unless I'm wrong since I'm outside in the galley I don't need a hood fan/vent.
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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby rkanz » Sat Aug 18, 2018 10:53 pm

My Camp Chef Everest is the best camp stove I have used. 20,000 btu, nice simmer, piezo igniter. I would replace the stove in my house with this. Starts and heats well at cold temps also.


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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby GuitarPhotog » Sat Aug 18, 2018 10:58 pm

travist wrote:So I will have a rear hatch galley like most tear drops, so if I install a stove into the counter it will still be used outside. I have no plans on using it inside, nor space to us it in there.

I will definitely be carrying a fire extinguisher, but unless I'm wrong since I'm outside in the galley I don't need a hood fan/vent.


You do not need a vent or fan. You might need a wind screen if you use a built-in.

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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby KTM_Guy » Sun Aug 19, 2018 2:56 pm

Just an FYI the Partner Steel stove was mention above and they are great stoves, but they need to use the the supplied regulator. It runs at a higher pressure than most camp stoves or other propane things in an RV. I'm getting ready to bit the bullet and order one soon.

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Re: RV Stove VS Camping Stove

Postby SunTrekker » Sat Aug 25, 2018 7:14 pm

Shadow Catcher wrote:We have an Atwood three burner and Nancy has no complaints, the true test :)


@Shadow, just trying to figure out stoves right now as well. How often do you use all three burners?

Everyone else....2 burners or 3 and why?


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