CNC Build -- Right Galley Trim Panel and Left

...ask your questions in the appropriate forums BUT document your build here...preferably in a single thread...dates for updates, are appreciated....

Re: CNC Build

Postby KCStudly » Wed Feb 05, 2014 10:23 pm

Oh. Cough, cough. :roll:

Maybe on the next one you might want to take a closer look at the foamie forum. By way of comparison, my raw foamie walls with door and inner skin weighed 45 lbs, and I probably have more wood in them than most others do. Just saying. :D

I jest a little, 8) but it is just another foamie advantage worth mentioning. I could handle my walls by myself fairly easily right up to the point I installed them. (Tho I never had to deal with wind... well, there was that one time when a gust of wind blew up thru the eaves of the loft, billowed out my plastic wall sheeting and knocked one of my walls over, but that is another story.)

Why do you suppose that one of your walls is much heavier than the other? What am I forgetting?
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Re: CNC Build

Postby RandyG » Wed Feb 05, 2014 11:53 pm

Hey Cap! Just found your build, you're doing a good job so far. Glad I joined in, keep it up.
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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Thu Feb 06, 2014 6:43 am

RandyG wrote:Hey Cap! Just found your build, you're doing a good job so far. Glad I joined in, keep it up.

Thanks Randy. I've been watching your build and seeing a lot of your posts. Welcome aboard! :beer:

KCStudly wrote:Maybe on the next one you might want to take a closer look at the foamie forum.

No question about it, I could learn a lot. You Foamies are the champs of light weight.

Okay, here's an easy one for you: The galley countertop is a fairly heavy piece when it's solid wood. How can I use foamie techniques to make a countertop that is lightweight, has a good work surface, and will add strength to the structure? And looks good. 60" x 30". Remember, I've got the CNC that can make molds or whatever. So if you can think it, I can probably make it. Anyone else that wants to chime in here is more than welcome.

I got a good buy on a maple butcherblock that I was going to use for the countertop, until I went to load it into my truck. Holy Smokes, that was heavy! It now adorns my kitchen island. It looks marvelous.
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KCStudly wrote:Why do you suppose that one of your walls is much heavier than the other? What am I forgetting?

Um... One has had a door opening cut and quite a bit of router dust removed, one hasn't? :whistle:

The second wall will catch up shortly. :)
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

Brad
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Re: CNC Build

Postby dustboy » Thu Feb 06, 2014 10:51 am

capnTelescope wrote:
Okay, here's an easy one for you: The galley countertop is a fairly heavy piece when it's solid wood. How can I use foamie techniques to make a countertop that is lightweight, has a good work surface, and will add strength to the structure? And looks good. 60" x 30". Remember, I've got the CNC that can make molds or whatever. So if you can think it, I can probably make it. Anyone else that wants to chime in here is more than welcome.


You could use a piece of stiff foam and laminate it with HPL (formica). A honeycomb material would be ideal, but maybe very expensive. Sandwich solid or ply wood at the edges so you can apply the bullnose.
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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Thu Feb 06, 2014 1:23 pm

dustboy wrote:You could use a piece of stiff foam and laminate it with HPL (formica).

Thanks for speaking up, DB. That's pretty much my first guess. I have a bunch of questions, since I'm a foamie noob. What kind of foam? styro-? Where do you get it? what kind of glue? I assume contact or solvent? Can the foam be fiberglassed (I'm thinking the bottom)? Can you/anyone point me to a basic technique thread?

I like this idea. I could easily shed 30-40 pounds here. :thumbsup:
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

Brad
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Re: CNC Build

Postby tac422 » Thu Feb 06, 2014 2:46 pm

You might think about using laminate flooring for the counter top ?
I've seen some that would almost look the same as the butcher block.
Lightweight, prefinished, and fairly scratch resistant ....
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Re: CNC Build

Postby RandyG » Thu Feb 06, 2014 8:01 pm

So are you thinking of still using the butcher block? If so, take some matirial out of the underside and replace it with foam. It would look sweet in the galley.
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Re: CNC Build

Postby KCStudly » Thu Feb 06, 2014 8:28 pm

It's like Pandora's Box, so be warned.

The Big Thrifty Thread is the genesis of "The Modern Foamie Movement" (my pet phrase). It is a monster thread with a lot of OT, but also a lot of development work and conceptualization.

It comes with an index thread (a work in progress courtesy of Rowerwet), sort of thrifty shorthand.

In a nut shell you have white bead expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam which is the generic version of the trade named "Styrofoam".

Then you have the pink and blue (sometimes green) construction board that is extruded polystyrene (XPS). Some of the thinner stock sizes have a thin clear film on one side (for handling integrity) that must be removed (peeled or sanded off) because it does not take glue. It is reasonably available in 1/2, 3/4, 1, 1-1/2 and 2 inch thicknesses, in 4x8, 2x8 and fan fold sheets. Some are tongue and groove, and there are also "scoreply" versions that have precut slits nearly thru (that's what I ended up with and other than causing some variation in surface level at the scores, has not been an issue).

Solvent based contact cement will eat the foam; but you can use water based, such as 3M 30NF Green (expensive).

Fiberglass (taken to mean polyester resin, Bondo, etc.) will eat the foam. Glass reinforced epoxy works great, so long as you do not use a heavy/hot batch; high heat will melt styrene.

Gorilla Glue (GG) is best for butt joints and will also work for smaller laminating tasks, but requires attention to locating, clamping, and masking due to expansion.

Great Stuff (GS) works well for filling and repairs, and at least one user reports that it works good for laminating and butt joints if you knock it down to prevent foaming. Clean the applicator tube with a drop or two of acetone; melts foam clean.

My own experimentation has proven that TB2 works good for wood to foam if the joints are tight. GG is better for so so fits.

TB2 also works great for laminating wood skins to foam provided you apply the glue evenly with a roller. Avoid puddles, or too much glue; the wood needs to be able to absorb all of the moisture in the glue since the foam will not allow it to air dry.

Personally, I did the exact opposite to what you are proposing. I made my walls and floor out of foam with thin wooden skins and will use a piece of well supported 1/2 inch ply for the structural deck of my counter. Contemplating a thin SS sheet for the finished surface. Durable and will take the heat from a heavy DO.
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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Thu Feb 06, 2014 11:18 pm

tac422 wrote:You might think about using laminate flooring for the counter top ?

Howdy tac422, thanks for joining in. That is another thought. I have made workbench tops from solid oak flooring. Problem is, you need something under to support the flooring, and then we're back to the weight thing. But if it was foam underneath... :thinking: This is not ruled out.

RandyG wrote:So are you thinking of still using the butcher block?

No, I think I'll keep it in the kitchen. It looks pretty good there. I'm going to do some R&D on foamie alternatives before I make a final decision. They'll make more if I want to get another one.

RandyG wrote:If so, take some matirial out of the underside and replace it with foam. It would look sweet in the galley.

I considered that, cuz it would look really, really good. :thinking: I would take material off the bottom and replace it with air. :D The tree hugger in me is offended by turning 40 (of about 75) pounds of that maple b-block to router dust. If I can't build a good foamie alternative, the tree hugger will have to go sit in the corner and shut up.

KCStudly wrote:The Big Thrifty Thread is the genesis of "The Modern Foamie Movement" (my pet phrase). It is a monster thread with a lot of OT, but also a lot of development work and conceptualization.

Found it. That is a big one! :shocked: Thanks KC. I'm going to dive in. I already have a TB2 test started.

I like your SS idea, too. Decisions, decisions. :?
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

Brad
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Re: CNC Build

Postby tac422 » Fri Feb 07, 2014 7:27 am

Regarding using the flooring...
I was thinking of a 2x2 ? framework toppped by the flooring.
If you have cabinets underneath, they would support it as well... :thinking:
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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Fri Feb 07, 2014 8:58 pm

tac422 wrote:I was thinking of a 2x2 ? framework toppped by the flooring.

Yep, any solution must have a frame for attaching to the tear. I'm just not completely sold on any one of these alternatives. The butcher block hands down looks best, SS looks like a real kitchen and matches my new stove, laminate flooring is practical and looks good. Granite would really look good. :D
Still :scratchthinking: about it. Stay tuned, I'll finger out something.
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

Brad
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Re: CNC Build

Postby capnTelescope » Fri Feb 07, 2014 9:29 pm

Progress progresses.

Today I got the first routing operation on the starboard wall done. Door opening, trimming the interior panel. The router is performing much better now, and things moved right along. No steps got lost, and right angles were square. :P

Here's the door cut out:
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Looking back to front:
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Today I discovered that the Bosch 1/4" downcut bit is much more effective than the equivalent Freud. The Bosch has a more spiral-ly spiral for a steeper downcut angle. Nice clean top edge with no splinters. The Bosch is at Lowe's, the Freud at HD. The Bosch gets the capnTelescope Seal of Approval. :thumbsup:

More router dust this weekend. Thanks for stopping by! :wine:
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it.

Brad
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Re: CNC Build

Postby RandyG » Fri Feb 07, 2014 9:42 pm

A granite countertop... might as well say to hell with light weight and build the whole thing out of stone. :lol:
If Fred Flintstone made a teardrop? :thinking:
Not saying I didn't consider granite as well, until I thought of the weight.
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Re: CNC Build

Postby tac422 » Fri Feb 07, 2014 10:24 pm

Granite... :thinking:
We have 18" square granite that's 1/4" thick as a backsplash in our kitchen. (It goes all the way to the ceiling.)
It's not very heavy, and a piece inset into a wood counter top would look awesome. It would need support underneath though.
just thinking, it might be doable if you really wanted to ?

PS: walls are looking great !
looks like you built the wiring in ?
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Re: CNC Build

Postby AlgoDan » Sat Feb 08, 2014 7:15 am

Hey Brad its looking good, I will keep watching if you keep building lol...
Here now but Camping later.............Dan

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