work safely with aluminum

Anything to do with mechanical, construction etc

Re: No gloves here

Postby TomS » Sat Aug 26, 2006 10:11 am

John Foote wrote:
madjack wrote:
John Foote wrote:If the glove hits the blade, your hand is going in there with it.


John, if the glove hits the blade, you are too late...you have already screwed up.......................... 8)


Granted, but screw-ups happen. If my bare hand goes into the blade, I pull it away, near instantaneously, minus some amount of flesh and whatnot. If I'm wearing a glove, and the blade grabs the glove, my hand goes into the blade and just hangs out there for awhile, until I or somebody turns off the saw and extracts the glove and it's assorted meat by-product contents. Any saw accdent is ugly, but a glove accident seems far more likely to to be stump ugly.


I avoid putting my hands near the blade at all costs. I ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS use a push stick when feeding narrow stock through the table saw.

Also, when feeding stock, I stand to the side of table, NOT behind it. If the piece kicks back I don't want to be in it's flight path.

Maybe, we ought to start another category dedicated to safety issues. This could include all aspects such shop safety, towing safety, campsite safety issues such as bears. Just a thought.
User avatar
TomS
1000 Club
1000 Club
 
Posts: 1367
Joined: Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:06 pm
Location: Fitchburg, MA

Re: No gloves here

Postby toypusher » Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:29 am

TomS wrote:...............Maybe, we ought to start another category dedicated to safety issues. This could include all aspects such shop safety, towing safety, campsite safety issues such as bears. Just a thought.


Just be sure to put up a real strong and bold DISCLAIMER!

Safety is not something to fool around about, just practice safe procedures 100% of the time.

Not everthing that is posted here is necessarily 100% accurate . Take all advise as someone's opinion and decide for yourself if it is for you, is the best advise.

I do agree with your tablesaw methods - 100%!!!
User avatar
toypusher
Site Admin
 
Posts: 42933
Images: 324
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2005 12:21 pm
Location: York, PA Area

has anyone tried this

Postby lgreed » Mon Sep 25, 2006 8:43 am

I was told at my "all knowing coffee shop coffee drinkers" that the best way to cut aluminum was to put a used carbide blade in the saw backwards and to be sure and score the aluminum cut and clamp it to wood stock to control the chatter. Is this the way to do it? :thinking:
If it ain't worth smoking it ain't worth eating!!
lgreed
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:10 am
Location: Central Illinois
Top

Re: has anyone tried this

Postby halfdome, Danny » Mon Sep 25, 2006 9:08 am

lgreed wrote:I was told at my "all knowing coffee shop coffee drinkers" that the best way to cut aluminum was to put a used carbide blade in the saw backwards and to be sure and score the aluminum cut and clamp it to wood stock to control the chatter. Is this the way to do it? :thinking:

I've used a saw with a blade on backwards from someones mistake and wouldn't wish anyone to run aluminum this way. Someone ought to drink decaf and rethink their advice. Danny
ImageImage
"Conditions are never just right. People who delay action until all factors are favorable do nothing". William Feather
Don't accept "It's Good Enough" build to the best of your abilities.
Image
Teardroppers Of Oregon & WashingtonImage
User avatar
halfdome, Danny
*Happy Camper
 
Posts: 5378
Images: 152
Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 11:02 pm
Location: Washington , Pew-al-up
Top

Maybe this will help

Postby racustomfab » Thu Dec 21, 2006 10:16 am

In my shop although I haven't built a trailer yet. I do deal with aluminum all the time.
On small pieces i used a small cut off wheel
Cut all my bigger pieces on a cheap/small delta bandsaw with a 6tpi blade
If and when I use a chop saw(very rarely) I always put something on the blade to prevent aluminum biuld-up and galling which makes the blade want to tear rather than cut.
I use a small stick of slippey stuff ( I think thats the name) available at most home improvment stores. However candle wax or even a bar of cheap soap will work in a pinch. Something is better than nothing at all.
With any cutting HEAT KILLS wiether it be the bit. blade, or you.

I was once told by an older gentleman (when I was little) "that even spittting on it was better than nothing"
Rick
racustomfab
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 11:40 am
Location: fresno,ca
Top

Postby tonyj » Tue Dec 26, 2006 10:54 pm

After the little accident that prompted the first post on this discussion, I started cutting all my aluminum with a jig saw. I found I could use the end of a 4x4 for squaring up all my angle cuts, and cutting those pieces in a straight line. I found I could hold most pieces to be cut very firmly against the 4X4, and those that I couldn't would clamp very easily.
Still graced with two eyes and ten fingers (due in no small part to luck!).

Just when you think a problem is solved, an uglier result replaces it.

tony
User avatar
tonyj
Super Lifetime Member
 
Posts: 2468
Images: 160
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Texas, Corpus Christi
Top

Re: has anyone tried this

Postby Podunkfla » Wed Dec 27, 2006 12:33 am

lgreed wrote:I was told at my "all knowing coffee shop coffee drinkers" that the best way to cut aluminum was to put a used carbide blade in the saw backwards and to be sure and score the aluminum cut and clamp it to wood stock to control the chatter. Is this the way to do it? :thinking:


Like Danny says... Your coffee shop buddies are full of hooey. A long time ago I used to use an old non-carbide blade (like a fine tooth plywood blade) backward to cut roof metal, like for barns, etc. Basicly, you are using it as a friction cutter that actually heats up and melts the steel. Now they make a cheap blade that is designed to work that way. Still... it makes a lousy cut that looks burnt along the edge and is left wickedly sharp and dangerous. A carbide tipped blade would be disasterious because the teeth could heat up and/or grab and are likely come off at high speed... not a good idea. As for using it for aluminum; I have never tried it and don't intend to. There are just too many far better ways to cut the stuff.
<B>~ Brick
<I>... I've done so much with so little for so long... Now I can do almost anything with nothing! </I></B>
Image...Lots more pix here!
User avatar
Podunkfla
ol' noodle haid
 
Posts: 2261
Images: 5
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 9:25 pm
Location: North Florida near the Suwannee River
Top

Safe Cutting

Postby frazzyfuzz » Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:42 pm

True story while cutting some wood on my table saw. Wood kicked back cought my copper braclet jammed it into my wrist 5 stititches later and scared to death I still don't know what I did wrong. No feather board too steep an angle on my push stick trying to do my best to be safe. Trip to the E R blood all over as im a bleeder because of meds Im still scared.????????????????? Jerry
frazzyfuzz
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 5:42 pm
Location: Centrail Ca
Top

Re: Safe Cutting

Postby halfdome, Danny » Sun Dec 30, 2007 10:02 pm

frazzyfuzz wrote:True story while cutting some wood on my table saw. Wood kicked back cought my copper braclet jammed it into my wrist 5 stititches later and scared to death I still don't know what I did wrong. No feather board too steep an angle on my push stick trying to do my best to be safe. Trip to the E R blood all over as im a bleeder because of meds Im still scared.????????????????? Jerry

Sorry that happened to you :( . One of the reasons I don't wear jewelry is for safety sake.
You never know when a tool will grab whatever your wearing and do the tangle ;) with it & you. :) Danny
ImageImage
"Conditions are never just right. People who delay action until all factors are favorable do nothing". William Feather
Don't accept "It's Good Enough" build to the best of your abilities.
Image
Teardroppers Of Oregon & WashingtonImage
User avatar
halfdome, Danny
*Happy Camper
 
Posts: 5378
Images: 152
Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 11:02 pm
Location: Washington , Pew-al-up
Top

Postby tonyj » Mon Dec 31, 2007 12:52 am

Really sorry to hear about your accident, and I am especially glad to hear it wasn't worse. Had a friend who just recently lost a little finger in a tablesaw mishap.

Have to agree with Danny about the jewelry. Also a good idea to watch out for open shirt cuffs or baggy shirt sleeves.

As to the kickback, could be several things. I would suggest it is time to at least do a tune up on your saw. Start with making sure you have a sharp, clean blade. Find some table saw directions to adjust and make sure the blade is parallel to the miter gauge slots and that the fence is parallel to the blade. A little misalignment in these areas can contribute to kick back. Check the blade guard and anti-kick back pawls to make sure they are in proper order.

None of us can escape having tools spit wood pieces back at us. The first defense is to make sure the tool is in proper working order.
Still graced with two eyes and ten fingers (due in no small part to luck!).

Just when you think a problem is solved, an uglier result replaces it.

tony
User avatar
tonyj
Super Lifetime Member
 
Posts: 2468
Images: 160
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Texas, Corpus Christi
Top

Best to slow down and think it thru

Postby madprinter » Tue Jan 01, 2008 10:35 am

I've worked with saws and wood all my life. Sometimes I get in a hurry, thats when trouble can come at you quick. I recently had to notch a piece of wood, and being in a hurry, did it freehand on my table saw. Just a small notch, it'll only take a second.( VERY STUPID thing for me to do). Anyway I hit a knot and board grabbed and shot back, taking the tip of my index finger thru the blade. I was lucky to still have fingers. Finger is fine now. And my sence of respect for my saws and safety is much improved.
Small cut off tool, like dremal or rotozip works great on small cuts in Aluminum. Will
User avatar
madprinter
The 300 Club
 
Posts: 332
Images: 26
Joined: Fri Dec 14, 2007 7:28 pm
Location: West Monroe Louisiana
Top

The correct blade, along with the proper lubrication is key.

Postby Trailer411 » Sun Feb 03, 2008 9:30 pm

Hey all,

My companies work with aluminum everyday. A good carbide tipped blade with about 6 tpi is key.

Also bee's wax is the best, although candle wax works ok too!

Wax it every cut and your blade should stay free from aluminum build-up.

The same goes for extra small cuts, although use a jig saw with about a medium blade. Wax it every few inches or so.
Trailer411
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2008 11:18 pm
Location: Highland
Top

Safety with saws....

Postby boukrev » Fri Jun 06, 2008 7:40 pm

I wont say anything about not thinking on the safe side but I hope your saw blade was not as high as the photo depicts.. A rule of thumb is that the blade should be up enough to cut the piece being cut by about a 1/16-1/8 inch. And a word of caution when working with metal always read and understand your manuals and always wear these safety glasses....... Oh yeah wear gloves. I almost lost my hand and life with a piece .125 thick stainless. I cut my right wrist wide open along with all the veins and that big artery in there... So stay safe.


Gregg
User avatar
boukrev
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 10:05 pm
Location: Sacratomato
Top

Re: Safety with saws....

Postby tonyj » Sat Jun 07, 2008 1:19 am

boukrev wrote:I wont say anything about not thinking on the safe side but I hope your saw blade was not as high as the photo depicts.. A rule of thumb is that the blade should be up enough to cut the piece being cut by about a 1/16-1/8 inch. And a word of caution when working with metal always read and understand your manuals and always wear these safety glasses....... Oh yeah wear gloves. I almost lost my hand and life with a piece .125 thick stainless. I cut my right wrist wide open along with all the veins and that big artery in there... So stay safe.


Gregg


Thank you for the observation and the cautionary tale.

Normally, I would agree with you, and when I cut wood I adjust the blade to cut no more than a quarter inch higher than the board being cut. That being said . . .

First, I do not recommend cutting aluminum with a tablesaw. I did it. I survived, but I think it is one of the most dangerous cutting operations I have done. I initially set the blade so that is was above the metal at about the level you suggest. Because of the angle of the teeth on the blade, the individual teeth were contacting the metal at almost 90 degrees. At that setting the blade would push the aluminum being cut up and back, in fact, kicking back. I set the blade higher so the contact angle was less severe and the teeth contacted the aluminum at a downward angle. The cutting action was smoother and in my mind safer than setting the blade lower.

A different blade might have required a different setting. I just know that blade height seemed to cut best and safest for me. But again, I don't recommend the method. If I were doing it over I would cut those legs down with either a jig saw, saber saw or bandsaw (or find someone dumber than me to do it, but I have to look far and wide on that point!).
Still graced with two eyes and ten fingers (due in no small part to luck!).

Just when you think a problem is solved, an uglier result replaces it.

tony
User avatar
tonyj
Super Lifetime Member
 
Posts: 2468
Images: 160
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Texas, Corpus Christi
Top

Postby halfdome, Danny » Sat Jun 07, 2008 9:48 am

Tony I have to agree with a high blade setting, the cutting angle keeps the aluminum down on the saw table. With the proper blade, a glove, sweatshirt and face shield aluminum can safely be cut on a table saw. I use an 80 tooth carbide blade made for cutting non ferris metals and have ripped up to 1/8" stock but have to wear a glove with the thick stuff to avoid the pain of metal hitting my hand. Gloves are dangerous on a table saw so use an adequate push stick and stay away from the blade. On TD #2 the .032 & .050 sheets cut like a dream on the table saw without a glove. :D Danny
ImageImage
"Conditions are never just right. People who delay action until all factors are favorable do nothing". William Feather
Don't accept "It's Good Enough" build to the best of your abilities.
Image
Teardroppers Of Oregon & WashingtonImage
User avatar
halfdome, Danny
*Happy Camper
 
Posts: 5378
Images: 152
Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 11:02 pm
Location: Washington , Pew-al-up
Top

PreviousNext

Return to Teardrop Construction Tips & Techniques

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests