Steak Grilling

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Steak Grilling

Postby Todah Tear » Sat Jul 03, 2010 12:16 pm

I'm not a big steak griller, but I bought a couple of them the other day and I want to grille them this weekend.

I usually grille pork chops. I have had some great steaks that someone else grilled and some that were not so good.

What do some of you who grille steaks use to tenderize your meat? Any techniques that have worked for you?

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Re: Steak Grilling

Postby michaelwpayton » Sat Jul 03, 2010 1:14 pm

Todah Tear wrote:... What do some of you who grille steaks use to tenderize your meat? Any techniques that have worked for you?


I've found the most effective way to ensure you end up with a good steak off the grille... is to use leather. That is, the wider you open your leather wallet, when purchasing the beef... the more tender it is likely to be when you eat it.

Good beef doesn't need a lot of prep... and all the prep in the world won't, really, help bad beef :)
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Re: Steak Grilling

Postby Todah Tear » Sat Jul 03, 2010 1:46 pm

michaelwpayton wrote:
Todah Tear wrote:... What do some of you who grille steaks use to tenderize your meat? Any techniques that have worked for you?


I've found the most effective way to ensure you end up with a good steak off the grille... is to use leather. That is, the wider you open your leather wallet, when purchasing the beef... the more tender it is likely to be when you eat it.

Good beef doesn't need a lot of prep... and all the prep in the world won't, really, help bad beef :)


That's funny, and I've heard the part about buying a good quality steak before. I have had some tough steak from pretty good restaurants too. That's why I rarely eat steak. It could have been that those restaurants were charging premium prices for bargin-brand meat.

That's why it is good to get multiple opinions.

Thanks,

Todah
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Postby asianflava » Sat Jul 03, 2010 2:43 pm

I prefer ribeyes and sirloins if on a budget. I do not poke the meat at all, and I do not use any tenderizing "methods" because it doesn't help.

It is very simple, I start with the steaks and rub olive oil on them, then I liberally put Montreal Steak seasoning on both sides, most of it will come off during grilling. I leave them out so they can get to room temp. I light the grill and get it hot, around 400-500 degrees. I put the steaks on and shuffle them around with tongs. Flip them at about 5-6min, then cook the other side for 5-6min.

Another way to get a juicy steak is to cook them "Sous Vide". Basically you put them in individual vacuum sealed bags and put them in hot water for about an hour. The hot water will cook them but they look really bad. You then throw them on a really hot grille like 600-700 degrees to sear the outside. It gives it a different texture but it requires some experimentation to get right.
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Postby caseydog » Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:22 pm

I thought I already posted to this same question from you, Todah, but it isn't here, and this thread is new today. :thinking:

I even made some wisecracks about Outback Steakhouse, which has terrible steaks.

Anywho, forget marinating and/or tenderizing, unless you buy the wrong cuts of beef for grilling. The key to a good steak is to buy good quality meats, and the right cuts for grilling, which is a "hot and fast" cooking method, as opposed to "low and slow" cooking used to "barbecue" meats like brisket.

My favorite is ribeye. NY Strips are a good second choice, IMO, and if you want lean meat, use tenderloin. Sirloin is cheaper, and always on sale, but it is usually a bit tough, and sometimes downright shoe-leather.

Certified Natural Angus Beef (NCAB) is available in most good stores, and is probably grass fed in pastures, as opposed to corn fed in feed lots (requiring antibiotics). Grass fed beef tastes better, and is a little healthier, too.

Look for well marbled steaks. Not big chunks of fat, but lots of small veins of fat. Those veins of fat cook down, keeping the meat moist and tender, and adding flavor to the steak.

Cook on a very hot grill, and get a nice sear on the meat. Do NOT puncture the meat when it is hot!!! Use tongs or a spatula to turn the meat, not a fork.

It takes practice to get good at telling doneness, but the softer the meat feels, the less done it is, and the firmer the meat feels, to more done it is. Just press it with your finger in the middle. Clench a fist, and press on your inside forearm muscle -- that is approximately what medium will feel like.

Let the meat rest for a few minutes after you take it off the grill, so all the juices won't run out when you cut the steak.

If your meat is undercooked, zap it for about 30 seconds in the microwave. If it is overcooked, it should still taste good, and you'll know more the next time you grill steak.

Bottom line: Buy the right cut of meat, buy quality meat, and you won't need to marinate or tenderize your steaks. :thumbsup:

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Re: Steak Grilling

Postby caseydog » Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:27 pm

michaelwpayton wrote:
Todah Tear wrote:... What do some of you who grille steaks use to tenderize your meat? Any techniques that have worked for you?


I've found the most effective way to ensure you end up with a good steak off the grille... is to use leather. That is, the wider you open your leather wallet, when purchasing the beef... the more tender it is likely to be when you eat it.

Good beef doesn't need a lot of prep... and all the prep in the world won't, really, help bad beef :)


I watch for good sales on good ribeyes, and buy a bunch. I use my Foodsaver to vacuum seal individual steaks, and they can freeze for months -- not that they last that long in my house.

Steaks in an air-free package will not freezer burn. When I'm ready to cook a frozen steak, I thaw it in the vacuum sealed bag to room temperature, season with kosher salt and black pepper, and cook.

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Postby deceiver » Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:38 pm

Ok, I'm a cheap steak person. I won't pay $8 lb for steak. or even much less. So, for you frugal people here's the dope on some BBQ steaks from my perspective. Those of you who spare no coinage for steak. I'm just giving another point of view. So go for it.

So, if you're looking at what is usually the lowest price steak that works well on a bbq it's Sirloin. One of the reasons the more expensive steaks are more tender is that they have more fat in them. London Broil. A sort of good tasting but tougher steak is hard to bbq as it has little fat. You have to keep flipping it to keep it from cooking too fast on the outside. Sirloin has a higher fat content. On the BBQ it drips and the flames shoot up. It cooks greasier and cooks inside as fast as outside and is a pretty good tasting and reasonably tender steak... mainly because of the fat content I'm sure.
It's too bad that these heart attacks on the rack are soooo good.
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Postby S. Heisley » Sat Jul 03, 2010 7:11 pm

Ribeye :thumbsup: :yes:

On tougher cuts, I've used something as simple as Italian salad dressing to tenderize it. When buying a tougher cut, look for the ones with the most fat marbling, too.
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Postby caseydog » Sat Jul 03, 2010 7:50 pm

deceiver wrote:Ok, I'm a cheap steak person. I won't pay $8 lb for steak. or even much less. So, for you frugal people here's the dope on some BBQ steaks from my perspective. Those of you who spare no coinage for steak. I'm just giving another point of view. So go for it.

So, if you're looking at what is usually the lowest price steak that works well on a bbq it's Sirloin. One of the reasons the more expensive steaks are more tender is that they have more fat in them. London Broil. A sort of good tasting but tougher steak is hard to bbq as it has little fat. You have to keep flipping it to keep it from cooking too fast on the outside. Sirloin has a higher fat content. On the BBQ it drips and the flames shoot up. It cooks greasier and cooks inside as fast as outside and is a pretty good tasting and reasonably tender steak... mainly because of the fat content I'm sure.
It's too bad that these heart attacks on the rack are soooo good.


If you like cheap steak, look at Flat Iron Steak. It is often available on sale for $4.99 a pound where I live. It is tender, full of flavor, and a really good deal. It is another steak I buy on sale, vacuum seal, and and freeze for later.

If $4.99 is too much, then I'd recommend chicken or a good burger. If I can't afford ribeye or flat iron steak, I'd rather eat a good burger than eat a tough steak.

BTW, I look at $8.00 a pound as a bargain for good steak. I don't make a lot of money, but I can afford to eat good steak because 90-percent of more of what I eat comes from a grocery store, and it is cooked by me.

The money I save by not buying processed and prepared by others food goes into buying quality meats and fresh produce.

Life is too short to eat tough steak. :lol:

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Last edited by caseydog on Sat Jul 03, 2010 8:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby caseydog » Sat Jul 03, 2010 7:52 pm

S. Heisley wrote:Ribeye :thumbsup: :yes:

On tougher cuts, I've used something as simple as Italian salad dressing to tenderize it. When buying a tougher cut, look for the ones with the most fat marbling, too.


Italian dressing works, because of the vinegar.

My way of dealing with tougher beef cuts is to buy it in roast form, and cook it low and slow. I may slow cook a brisket tomorrow.

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Postby kajamelu4 » Sat Jul 03, 2010 8:27 pm

As someone who raises their own steaks, (purebred Angus) there have been some good points on here. Never, never poke your steak. If the juices run out, you will have a tougher piece of meat. Bringing your meat closer to room temp before grilling also seems to help. We prefer to marinate our steaks for 2 days before cooking, in the fridge of course! Our favorite is a marinade called Allegro. We get it at Sam's or Walmart. Always have your grill hot before placing your meat on it. Sear both sides quickly to hold in the juices, then continue cooking to your favored degree of doneness.
Good luck!

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Postby parnold » Sat Jul 03, 2010 8:35 pm

T-Bone or Porterhouse for me, but an occasional sirloin if I'm short on cash. I've found the way you cut london broil makes all the difference in the world. I look for the grain, cut against it, and also cut on a bias (slanted) I use a very sharp knife and cut thin pieces. With "real" steak, I only use salt and pepper, with london broil, I'll usually us a lemon marinade that's actually made for chicken. Meat should be at room temperature, and a high temp initial sear is important.

Meat doneness.... my son taught me this on, learned it in his culinary training, not sure if it was in tech school or at CIA.
Touch your pointer finger and thumb, and press the meaty part of your hand where they meet. If the steak is this soft, it is rare! As you move your thumb to each subsequent finger, that meaty area stiffens. Thumb to pinky is well done, thumb to "friendly" finger is medium rare, thumb to ring finger is medium.
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Postby Miriam C. » Sat Jul 03, 2010 9:00 pm

:lol: As I got older I began to realize that I don't have the energy to chew all that stuff. I have always loved Sirloin and buy it ground now. However, some real butter will help with any steak if it gets dry. Just remember that the thicker the steak the slower you cook it. And the thinner needs a higher temp. Kills the bad stuff. I get steaks from a real butcher. They have a stronger interest in my coming back.
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Postby Todah Tear » Sun Jul 04, 2010 2:56 pm

caseydog wrote:I thought I already posted to this same question from you, Todah, but it isn't here, and this thread is new today. :thinking:
CD


I asked the question in the Joe Pool thread of the South Central section because you all mentioned grilling a bunch of steaks at that gathering in the fall. I figured some you guys knew about grilling steaks. Since I only got one response, I posted in the recipe section where the camp cooks come.

Anyway....

I know my way around a grill pretty good for other meats (pork, chicken, fish, crab), but I am a novice when it comes to steak...didn't want to mess them up.

Thanks for the tips guys! I am grilling as I type this.

Bon Appetit!
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Postby caseydog » Sun Jul 04, 2010 3:14 pm

Todah Tear wrote:
caseydog wrote:I thought I already posted to this same question from you, Todah, but it isn't here, and this thread is new today. :thinking:
CD


I asked the question in the Joe Pool thread of the South Central section because you all mentioned grilling a bunch of steaks at that gathering in the fall. I figured some you guys knew about grilling steaks. Since I only got one response, I posted in the recipe section where the camp cooks come.

Anyway....

I know my way around a grill pretty good for other meats (pork, chicken, fish, crab), but I am a novice when it comes to steak...didn't want to mess them up.

Thanks for the tips guys! I am grilling as I type this.

Bon Appetit!


Steak will be closest to a good thick pork chop. You want to cook it quickly over high heat to get a nice crust and keep it juicy inside.

And, like pork chops, your fattier cuts will be juicier and more flavorful.

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