Steak Grilling

Your recipes which you'd like to see in the T&TTT Cookbook #2.

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Postby Todah Tear » Sun Jul 04, 2010 6:26 pm

I think Hillary Clinton said it best, "It takes a village of teardroppers to grille a steak."

Well done guys! For my first steak grilling, the piece that I had was delicious and tender. I had seasoned them yesterday and they sat in the frig over night. I sprinkled some Allegro on them as they cooked.

I had just gotten home from church earlier, so I went with technique that would get dinner on the table quickest...and it worked. :thumbsup:

I will try the other techniques on my next tries.

Thanks,

Todah
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Postby chorizon » Sun Jul 04, 2010 6:44 pm

We've used Allegro and it is good stuff. Italian dressing definitely helps out a steak as well.

Here lately we've been getting some pretty decent ribeyes and have gone back to a more traditional route. I think taste preferences change from time to time.

Our latest recipe we love calls for just 2 ingredients; Kosher Salt, and Black Pepper. We'll take a fresh ribeye and sprinkle the Kosher Salt and crack some Black Pepper on both sides and rub it in.

I'll get the gas grill going on high heat and let it warm up.

I'll throw the steaks on when the grill is good and hot (500-600 degrees)

I'll close the lid and forget about it (yeah right!) for 4 minutes.

Then give the steaks a flip and 3 more minutes.

I'll put the steaks on a plate and cover them with tinfoil for 5 minutes (the "resting" thing others have mentioned).

These steaks turn out phenomenal! The seasoning is salt and black pepper!

One other thing to note, when I yank the steaks off the grill they are probably somewhere between rare and medium-rare. After the "resting" period they are a perfect medium-rare!
:thumbsup:

More than anything, do what you like! In my opinion you can't do too much wrong with a steak other than overcooking it and turning it into a piece of leather. Glad you had such a success today!
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Postby WarPony » Sun Jul 04, 2010 7:11 pm

What I use on all my steaks, Daddy Hinkles out of Tulsa, Oklahoma. It'll make a crap steak great and a great steak even better!! There are 3 or 4 different flavors, I like the Southwest and the Hotter than $600.

http://www.daddyhinkles.com

My local grocery stores sell it here (Apple Market and Dillons/Kroger) and it comes in small, single use packets or kits with the dry rub and marinade that will last a long time.

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Postby caseydog » Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:22 pm

I just finished eating a steak with grilled corn on the cob. Yum!

It was a ribeye, of course, seasoned with kosher salt and fresh black pepper, rubbed in with a little olive oil. I cooked it over lump charcoal. I don't exactly know the temperature, since my IR thermometer stops at 600 degrees.

It turned out a perfect medium, with a tasty crust.

I put the corn on after I flipped the steak, and kept it moving.

I don't always eat steak, but when I do, I prefer ribeye.

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Stay hungry my friends. ;)


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Postby Todah Tear » Mon Jul 05, 2010 1:43 pm

caseydog wrote:I don't always eat steak, but when I do, I prefer ribeye.

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Stay hungry my friends. ;)

CD


Yet another great quote! :lol:

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Postby Kurt (Indiana) » Mon Jul 05, 2010 4:53 pm

caseydog wrote:
If you like cheap steak, look at Flat Iron Steak. It is often available on sale for $4.99 a pound where I live. It is tender, full of flavor, and a really good deal. It is another steak I buy on sale, vacuum seal, and and freeze for later.

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CD, I totally agree about "Flat Iron steak". I used to love (marinaded) Flank steak but it's becoming hard to find for some reason. Flat Iron is almost fool proof and is really flavorful and tender when marinaded.

If I buy a bigger quantity, I like to marinade (first) and freeze in sealed bags for use later.

It's becoming one of my favorite cuts. :thumbsup:
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Postby Mike-n-Britney » Tue Jul 06, 2010 11:51 am

caseydog wrote:I just finished eating a steak with grilled corn on the cob. Yum!

It was a ribeye, of course, seasoned with kosher salt and fresh black pepper, rubbed in with a little olive oil.

It turned out a perfect medium, with a tasty crust.

I put the corn on after I flipped the steak, and kept it moving.


Our camping trips are usually Fri-Sat-Sun, and we plan one really good meal and this is EXACTLY what we usually plan! Ribeye, corn on the cob, and some jalapeno pinto beans.

Mmm, mm, mm, mm, mmmmmmm... Tasty!
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Postby Gaston » Mon Jul 12, 2010 6:13 pm

Raise your own beef (lowline angus), never let it have an adrenalin event, kill quick while relaxed in the field and most important Cook it hot, fast ,and never more than medium rare :thumbsup:
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Teryaki

Postby eamarquardt » Mon Jul 12, 2010 8:26 pm

For some reason tri tip is touted out here. I find it tough. However if you marinate it for a day or two in the reefer in a solution of:

1/2 soy sauce
1/2 water
crushed garlic (to taste)
thinly sliced fresh ginger root (to taste)
and a little sugar

it becomes much better. Better yet, cut the tri tip into 3/4" to 1" chunks, skewer it with bell pepper, mushrooms, pineapple, and onion and grill and you have it all! Really easy and tastes great.

I usually do the skewer method and just put the meat in a half gallon wide mouth container, mix equal parts of water and soy sauce until the meat is covered and then add the ginger, sugar, garlic and then shake. I take the container out and shake it once or twice in the day or two I let it sit.

Cheers,

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Postby mikeschn » Tue Jul 13, 2010 3:56 am

The guys pretty much have it covered. You get what you pay for! ;)

If it's absolutely got to be tender, try filet mignon. You could also buy a beef tenderloin and cut it yourself.

Ribeyes are typically a good choice for a tender juicy steak. In either case you don't want to over cook it. Medium rare is good.

After you've flipped it, you know it's medium when the blood starts to come thru to the top. If you can catch it just before the blood starts to come through, you've got medium rare.

On a budget? Buy Sirloin. Slice it real thin across the grain.

Here's how to tell how well done your steak is...

http://www.bbqreport.com/archives/barbe ... k-is-done/

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Postby deceiver » Tue Jul 13, 2010 4:01 am

Another reason I often buy the less expensive and not really conducive to the BBQ steaks like London Broil is the grease effect.

After the steak is cooked. If there happens to be any left, watch the higher priced cuts. They curl up and harden and often cloud over with grease. The greasier steaks often (always?) taste the best.

Sorry to be a downer but as I get older I begin to think of those things and often wonder if I should have years ago.
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Postby asianflava » Tue Jul 13, 2010 8:11 am

Until a couple years ago, I'd never heard of a "Tri Tip" I did some research and found out that it is pretty much a Claifornia thing. Basically just a bottom sirloin.

Just like the fancy name "Delmonico" is basically a ribeye.
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Postby kennyrayandersen » Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:49 pm

Nice thread and lots of good advice. I’ll jump in the rib eye bandwagon since I also think it’s harder to screw one up due to the marbling and high-fat content. One thing I do to save money is to buy a rib eye roast, and then have it sliced. Kroger sometimes runs specials in the summer and they will slice it for free (1 inch is a pretty good number). Vacuum pack them and then freeze. I used to get pretty fancy with the marinades, but I’m down to salt (kosher if you got it), pepper (black and fresh – like my women (joke!)), but I also put on a bit of garlic powder as well (gives it a nice little kick.).

The other thing Mike and some others mentioned is DO NOT OVER-COOK YOUR STEAK! (Yes, I was shouting!). A friend of mine, who was particularly enjoying his steak that I had cooked him ask me why it was so tender. I replied that I hadn’t cooked the cr*p out of it. I grew up on well-done, but have since learned better – never more than medium rare (red, but not raw).
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Postby chorizon » Tue Jul 13, 2010 8:00 pm

Funny how the steak connoisseurs keep referring to the perfect steak in two pretty different conditions.

Is the perfect steak medium or medium-rare?

I'll be honest and go ahead and admit I love a steak that's a "little" red in the middle. :thumbsup:
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Postby Facemeltingly Epic » Tue Jul 13, 2010 8:16 pm

chorizon wrote:Funny how the steak connoisseurs keep referring to the perfect steak in two pretty different conditions.

Is the perfect steak medium or medium-rare?

I'll be honest and go ahead and admit I love a steak that's a "little" red in the middle. :thumbsup:


I just like mine to hold still while I cut into it. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
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